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Your top (computer related) books to read


metatron
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I was just wondering what are your top (computer related) books you think everyone should read.

K&R The C Programming Language

The Art of Assembly Language

Professional LAMP - Linux, Apache, MySQL, & PHP5 Web Development

A Professionals Guide To Data Communication In A TCPIP World

Data Networks IP and the Internet Protocols Design and Operation

RFID Security

RFID Essentials

Linux Shell Scripting With Bash

UNIX Filesystems - Evolution, Design, & Implementation

Linux Bible

Linux Device Drivers

Writing Security Tools and Exploits

The Shellcoder's Handbook - Discovering And Exploiting Security Holes

Absolute OpenBSD - Unix For The Practical Paranoid

Understanding The Linux Kernel

802.11 Wireles Networks The Definitive Guide

Sockets, Shellcode, Porting, & Coding: Reverse Engineering Exploits and Tool Coding for Security Professionals

Wireless Communications

Practical VoIP Security

The Art of Software Testing

Bulletproof Wireless Security - GSM, UMTS, 802.11, And Ad Hoc Security

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im not ur biggest o'reilly fan but i'd have to include these:

dns/bind

perl

unix in a nutshell (for beginners)

But to be honest I dont really buy books (tech obviously) anymore. I generally print of the web. For example, i needed to brush up on my perl-fu recently so I found a nice pdf. But since I only needed 2-3 chapters, I just printed them off. Read on the bus. Done and in the bin. Plus you get the latest shit.

Nothing against the books mentioned though, might give this: Absolute OpenBSD - Unix For The Practical Paranoid a go. Although isn't RFID Security an oxymoron? :wink:

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I like to read so I buy a lot of books, but I’m sure all of the books I listed are available somewhere for free.

I tend to find even if I know enough about a subject I will still read a book on it to see if there is anything new or interesting in that area, or sometimes just because I have some time to kill.

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Yea i spotted a few of your books I may have on pdf somewhere (don't you love unprotected online booking ftp servers in russia).

As for reading tech books for enjoyment... i remember reading some books on Eiffel* and pro-logic. A language (not exclusively) for AI. I would never use the language, probably wouldn't even bother learning it beyond what was necessary for the book. There was an interesting example on how to program a state machine to tell whether a platform on the tube (London underground train system) was full, half full or empty! ...well it was interesting to me.... An interesting aside might be, what books like this have other people read?

*Eiffel has the most insane equality char (if my memory is correct): '::=' imagine typing that a few thousand times!

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Just to add a few to metatrons awesome list

Introduction to JAVA

Problem Solving with C++: The Object of Programming

Modern Operating Systems

Linux: The Text Book

My Pop's Got me this for Christmas, "The Unofficial Guide to Ethical Hacking" by ankit fadia. An ok read, really a read for noobs and not nearly thorough enough, but it does cover a wide array of topics. Though the TCP/IP section and PERL section were pretty good.

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Advanced Programming in the UNIX Environment by W. Richard Stevens (ISBN 0-201-56317-7)

To me, this is pretty much the definitive reference book for writing C code on UNIX.

Back when I was in school I also got a book that was called "The POSIX.1c standard" or some such. Again, a reference book, but without examples, allowing it to be paperback format. When I had to write code that had to ran unmodified on pretty much any platform in common use at that time, it was an invaluable resource.

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Advanced Programming in the UNIX Environment by W. Richard Stevens (ISBN 0-201-56317-7)

To me, this is pretty much the definitive reference book for writing C code on UNIX.

...snip

I agree! That big'un sits on my desk within easy reach all the time.

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I would like to add one book every software developer should have on their shelf already:

Design Patterns, it will change the way you code. At the very least it will allow you to communicate with other developers more easily.

The wiki mentions this book "has been superseded in practice by a spate of more recent, accessibly-written books"... Any idea what books they are talking about? I'd hate becoming a great software developer BEFORE you can understand a book about great software development...

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The Design and Implemetation of 4.4BSD

The Art of Computer Programming

TCP/IP Illustrated Volume III

Lions' Commentary on UNIX 6th Edition with Sourc code

The BSD 4.4 Manual set

The C Programming Language ANSI Edition

The UNIX programming environment

Advanced programming in the UNIX environment

Learning PERL

Learning PHP

Learning the VI editor

UNIX in a Nutshell

Sendmail

UNIX System Adminastration Handbook

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The wiki mentions this book "has been superseded in practice by a spate of more recent, accessibly-written books"... Any idea what books they are talking about? I'd hate becoming a great software developer BEFORE you can understand a book about great software development...

I would say that the one who wrote that comment in wikipedia is a weak-minded fool. But still, it isn't a book for beginners but rather one for those who are ready for larger projects.

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The wiki mentions this book "has been superseded in practice by a spate of more recent, accessibly-written books"... Any idea what books they are talking about? I'd hate becoming a great software developer BEFORE you can understand a book about great software development...

I would say that the one who wrote that comment in wikipedia is a weak-minded fool. But still, it isn't a book for beginners but rather one for those who are ready for larger projects.

No, I would say the guy who wrote that comment in wikipedia was able to put aside his elitism and feelings of superiority towards non-übergeeks and give an unbiased, clear indication of the expected level of expertise of the person who'd buy this book.

There's enough programmers out there that would like to evolve without skipping half the steps necessary.

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