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Slackware step by step install guide...


Luka_Krmpotic
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wow slackware install is shit. If a new linux user saw this..... they'd stick to whatever they'd been using. Its the oldest dist... and still hasnt got a decent install program. SUSE has had a good one since 8.0 days. for shame, for shame i tell you!

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wow slackware install is shit. If a new linux user saw this..... they'd stick to whatever they'd been using. Its the oldest dist... and still hasnt got a decent install program. SUSE has had a good one since 8.0 days. for shame, for shame i tell you!

Depends on what you call "a decent installer"... I love the slackware installer. The amount of times I've had problems with graphical installers and my obscure hardware is just silly.

Just because it doesn't look pretty doesn't mean it's not easy to do. Slackware was one of the first distros I ever installed. It was easy enough, and I learnt more about configuring linux that I have done from any other distros.

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the suse one (suse 10 ) requires no learning...point click ...duh.....its done.u can do an install in like 8 clicks. Or if your more tech there's an expert option. The installer also runs in console mode (curses i think)

There is no excuse for not having a decent easy gui install option. I should not have to know what an fstab is. When partitioning i should see a shiny bar...and a button that says "do this automatically" or something. If more linux dist had this 'easy' option. We'd have 5.5% share ;) heh heh

Unix people depress me sometimes...... "oh people can learn command-line"..... "compiling isnt hard"

fucking nuts. Someone skipped user interface design module at university.

That said if your a bit more technically minded im sure slackware install is nice

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I like the slackware installer as well but it is not for new people to linux. Suse and fedora have installers that are tailored for new people. And if your a new user and you want to try gentoo or freebsd well.... Run.

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I have to say OpenBSD has the best installer, if you feel like doing everything,

i've installed OpenBSD.

however, that's definetly not for the n00b

having to make your own bootable cd then using the most annoying disk partitiing utility, not the easiest thing to do.

+ not even a desktop on the default install.

again, not for the faint of heart

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DesktopBSD is prety easy. It's main problem when installing as that it doesn't offer you to like do any thing "special". It doesn't allow you to have like /home on one drive and then / on another. It has to be installed on to one hard drive. It does, however, give you the option to partion free space on the hard drive and install a boot loader so it will work with what ever OS you have installed on the other partion.

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I know nothing about Linux, really, but was able to get Ubuntu to install and utilize the Grub bootloader. (Gee, I feel so 'knowledgable' just mentioning Grub. {Snort})

I've seen people mention that Ubuntu is great for people who are new to Linux, but damn. Part of the reason Linux still hasn't done anything noticable to weaken Windows' stranglehold on the market is that Joe User (that would be me) who is technically inclined and actually interested in learning, can still find all too many confusing terms or methodologies in the GUI itself. Microsoft has done a good job of hiding the ugly side of Windows with the GUI.

It's certainly going to take a while for me, a Linux dabbler, to feel comfortable using Linux. I could start using it tomorrow full time, but I would hate it. I guess that's how one learns, though.

So speaking of Linux, does anyone know how to change the default startup option in Grub, or even how to disable the countdown timer?

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The problem is that when people see a text-based interface, they assume they're working with the very latest technology developed in Soviet Russia back in the 70s.

To some people anything that involves more than clicking a mouse is 'hard'. These people are generally considered 'users', and should behave as such (i.e. leave the installation to the professionals).

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