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BlackAdder
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i dont know if this post is in the right part of the forum but i wanted to ask what is the best language (coding) to start off with? (im a noob by the way) i ahve always wanted to start programming and i have got a lot of spare time recently as i quit wow (best thing ive ever done). just wanted to know ur guys thoughts any tuts out there or books you could recommend as well as programs (i have heard about pygames for pytom coding) dont know if that is revelant but if you can hel thanks

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"If you start coding make sure you check your spelling."

yeah i use text speak and abbreviations alot but i do type english for reports and coursework so i know that i have to check. i am actually studying web design i want an easy language to start me off flash based coding is a pain. The teacher being crap at flash isnt a great help either.

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i dont know if this post is in the right part of the forum but i wanted to ask what is the best language (coding) to start off with? (im a noob by the way) i ahve always wanted to start programming and i have got a lot of spare time recently as i quit wow (best thing ive ever done). just wanted to know ur guys thoughts any tuts out there or books you could recommend as well as programs (i have heard about pygames for pytom coding) dont know if that is revelant but if you can hel thanks

There is no "best language" to code in. It all depends on what your needs are, how you think/learn, what you feel comfortable using, and sometimes, with non cross-platform languages/libraries, your OS. I started using VB '08 but moved to C because I didn't feel like I was learning the "real" stuff. I felt like a lil' skiddie because I didn't know what was really going on. Anyways, you might have to try out a couple of languages before you find what you like and without knowing what language you want to code in you can't really be looking for guides too much lol but FYI, google FTW!!

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It really depends on what you like.

If you like to create a window with buttons, drawings, textboxes, tables, ... you might want to start with Visual Basic or better, with C#

If you think windows aren't that important, but you like to stress your CPU as much as you can, perhappes C++ would be great for you.

If you love colors and shapes jumping around, interacting with you, try out flash.

If you like to optimise just one process that you will do millions and millions of times as fast as possibel, you might get happy with C and digg in to Assembler, but that's the hardcore nasty dirty stuff that nobody really likes.

If you like to just messing around, having some intellectual fun with yourselfe, try out a esoteric language, like BrainFuck.

Visaul Basic, C#, C++, C are very similar. If you know one, you won't have problem understanding the others, and with 1 week training you will learn them. They're like French, Italian, Spanish, Portuguese, Latin. If you know two of them, you know them all.

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I'd personally start with Java or C++; personal preference and great platform neutral (for the most part). I've been told that Alice is a great place to start learning fundamentals and be able to see what your programs do (it's not so abstract), but I have never used it, seen it being used, nor known someone that has ever used it. Not to confuse you further, but python is also widely recommended for it's "ease."

Edit:

I changed my mind, you should learn MIPS..., and know what each opcode, rt, rd, rs, funct and all that in binary by heart.*

*(Don't ever do this, please. It's awful)

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Proper XHTML and CSS for web design, PHP and Javascript/ajax for server side and scripting languages. Thats where I would start. The rest is pretty much specialized for certain things, ex: VBScript only works in Internet Explorer, so coding a site in VBS is limiting your user base.

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I'd go with Python or PHP (as said before). Also, if you like lower level, C and ASM. The latter can get frustrating and sometimes confusing and the former is just annoying at times, but they're both still fun to play with.

f you like to optimise just one process that you will do millions and millions of times as fast as possibel, you might get happy with C and digg in to Assembler, but that's the hardcore nasty dirty stuff that nobody really likes.

They're fun to play with and a great place to figure out how different programming concepts that are done for you in other languages actually work (like how socket(), OOP (if you implement it in the language), etc. work). It's also good to know so that you can debug programs easier as debuggers usually give you a disassembled version of the program and where the program failed.

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Having tried both C and C++ I would suggest that you start out with something like PHP or Python (Python being the one I chose). Python at first may seem as though it is very limited (one draw back at the beginning is I wanted to create EXE (you can use py2exe for that.)). But as I want along I began to find that just because it didn't make me dizzy trying to learn it from a guide (python I just played with it in the IDE and looked at other code and used google to find specific stuff) like C or C++ did.

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I think this somewhat mirrors what someone else said earlier, but really language is irrelevant for the most part. If you're going to write software, the design is much more important, the language comes secondary. So in your case, it really just comes down to what you want to do or what you want to learn.

If you want to make easy GUI's and not worry about platform, try Java. If you only want Windows stuff, the .NET languages are great. If you want to be more low-level or work in the kernel, you'll use C and assembly. And whoever suggested MIPS to you probably doesn't know what they're talking about. Your system probably runs x86, unless you're planning on working with embedded devices, then by all means check out MIPS, it's a lot easier to play with. And the byte-code is easier to remember and disassemble in your head. But that's beside the point.

Web apps are full of great languages that are all pretty much the same.

If you decide on a language you want to try out, tell us-- I'm sure providing tutorials will be easier that way.

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I would recommend C# as it will get you used to the C like syntax which many other languages tend to incorporate e.g. PHP, and it will let you create quite powerful interfaces rapidly ( Click here for the free download )

As someone else already said though there isn't a "best language", but when your starting off it might be worth while going in for something like C# or VB as you can create things that have a high level of interaction which can be very fulfilling when you first start programming as most people don't tend to be bothered about things such as polymorphism and threads when they first start.

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My advice for you, start programming on a *nix box in C, or even C++. And use a text editor and a command line compiler. It's the best way to really understand the computer. Please don't start with Visual Basic. As Dijkstra said,

It is practically impossible to teach good programming to students that have had a prior exposure to BASIC: as potential programmers they are mentally mutilated beyond hope of regeneration.

It's just as true about Visual Basic.

Too many people who are interested in programming want to make some cool window pop up with buttons and textboxes and such as soon as they can, but you'll just end up relearning all you missed out on. The only appropriate first program is printf("Hello World!\n");

If you really aren't interested in learning the fundamentals and core of how to talk to a computer, and what you're looking for is simple rapid application development in a Windows environment, at least start with Visual C#, it's a good compromise between Visual Basic and Visual C++.

Or of course there's MIPS.

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The only appropriate first program is printf("Hello World!\n");

Amen

Or of course there's MIPS.

Hell no! Stay away from this~! MIPS is the devil...,

a=0 == addi $t0,$zero,0

It's just stupid..., loops are even stupider. I'll branch on YOUR equal. Oh boy, I'm not making any sense..., perhaps I'm just bitter.

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a=0 == addi $t0,$zero,0

It's just stupid..., loops are even stupider. I'll branch on YOUR equal. Oh boy, I'm not making any sense..., perhaps I'm just bitter.

I see why you're bitter... you didn't do to well in your computer architecture class did you...

li $t0, 0

(Sorry, I had to)

MIPS is the greatest language that I'll NEVER EVER use. lol

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