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ISP IP Address Allocations


digip
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I have a high speed cable connection through Comcast. I normally would have my ip address saved in a text file for when I needed it, like for VNC, etc, but I noticed that it recently changed. I was unaware of it until I tried to connect to my old IP address. I then decided to take back th ip address and manually assigned it in my router and low and behold, I was able to get back the IP address I used to have. What I did notice while it was assigned to this new address my connections seemed slower than they had in the past, thus leading to my question.

Does an ISP assign addresses based on speed or do they just default to whatever is in the pool at the time of assignment? I thought that Cable providers assign each account a static address, making it easier to monitor accounts, etc.

Two things. (1) if I can change this at will, what chances do they have to track someones use while online, and (2), are certain ip ranges restricted for bandwidth over other accounts.

Where I live they have a few different tiers of speed to offer. Up to 6megs and over 6 megs, depending on the account you have and area you live in. So, if I found one of these addresses that was assigned in the higher traffic pool, would my speed increase if I was able to assign myself one?

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Well, ISPs normally do not assign static IP addresses because then end users running web servers and things of that nature would become more common, which is not wanted. Also, no, a changing IP address doesn't make you harder to monitor by your ISP. They keep a database of exactly who was assigned what IP when. If you were using the IP at that time, they'll be able to catch you.

Speed is always relative. However, you might've gotten an IP on Comcast's older network which lowered your speeds or something like that. Who knows. Maybe it's just luck.

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They don't use static IP's unless you pay for them. They might use SDHCP though, which would assign you the same public IP based on MAC address, which you can change (unplug modem from router, spoof its WAN MAC, wait 20 mins and plug it back in). Or, they use very long lease times, which your router will renew, thus giving you a "static" IP. If you change your mac address, and subsiqently your IP address, they will still be able to track the modem your using to connect (which is tied to your billing details). To get around this, you could clone/steal another modem and use that, depending how they police the network you might find this works fine or you may get your house raided by the FBI (look up the people who uncapped there modems to run at 100mbs). If your using ADSL they will be able to track you by the line you used to connect to the exchange, whatever modem your using.

As for different IP's ranges for different billing plans, it is possible that they will organize it in such a way. I have found that with NTL, when I moved I had my internet setup as a static address for some reason (but statically set to the IP the DCHP was giving me. At my new house my internet worked straight away, with the same statically set IP. Later I realized I was using static, and set it back to dhcp. My connection was dropped, and then came back with a new IP, in the exact same subnet (about 5 addresses higher). But when they were doing work on the network, I found that the IP range was different depending on weather my traffic was going via Nottingham, Leicester or Derby. So it would appear that NTL organize things via area's rather than the plan your on.

I don't supposed you ran traceroutes at all? You may find that the address your being assigned is routing you away from equipment in your local area, thus giving you a slower connection. Also, get yourself a dynDNS, and using your router to maintain that, rather than using a IP.

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@ digip,

Agree with VaKo, get you a dyndns and use that instead of trying to remember your IP. As far as your post this is how cable provider's are set up:

Their are Nodes that cover a certain amount of area's, which routes back to their head end to a device containing these I believe "Hot Swappable" cards in them that they have set to only allow 125 modems per card. (I forget how many cards there were per device) If you were to take your modem and move it to a different location, but still in the same node it will work just fine and it will still come back to you if abuse activity took place.

As far as the speeds they are by MAC address basis, but cloning don't work no more. It use to when they cared what the modem was connected to, then you could just clone the mac on any device the modem was connected to and be good, but not anymore. When you get any cable modem and connect it, as long as it sync's up it will automatically give you a 10.?.?.? IP which in turn means needs to be registered. Now you can enter in a static IP or even an old IP you use to have and you will be able to route out to the internet, but yes your speeds will be extremely slow. You won't notice much as far as just surfing, but when running speed tests or downloading file's you will notice quickly.

I've been trying to figure out a way to get by the registration issue and get the full speed 6, 10 or whatever the provider offer's, but I haven't messed with that for awhile :-)

Hope this helps some.

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They don't use static IP's unless you pay for them. They might use SDHCP though, which would assign you the same public IP based on MAC address, which you can change (unplug modem from router, spoof its WAN MAC, wait 20 mins and plug it back in). Or, they use very long lease times, which your router will renew, thus giving you a "static" IP. If you change your mac address, and subsiqently your IP address, they will still be able to track the modem your using to connect (which is tied to your billing details). To get around this, you could clone/steal another modem and use that, depending how they police the network you might find this works fine or you may get your house raided by the FBI (look up the people who uncapped there modems to run at 100mbs). If your using ADSL they will be able to track you by the line you used to connect to the exchange, whatever modem your using.

As for different IP's ranges for different billing plans, it is possible that they will organize it in such a way. I have found that with NTL, when I moved I had my internet setup as a static address for some reason (but statically set to the IP the DCHP was giving me. At my new house my internet worked straight away, with the same statically set IP. Later I realized I was using static, and set it back to dhcp. My connection was dropped, and then came back with a new IP, in the exact same subnet (about 5 addresses higher). But when they were doing work on the network, I found that the IP range was different depending on weather my traffic was going via Nottingham, Leicester or Derby. So it would appear that NTL organize things via area's rather than the plan your on.

I don't supposed you ran traceroutes at all? You may find that the address your being assigned is routing you away from equipment in your local area, thus giving you a slower connection. Also, get yourself a dynDNS, and using your router to maintain that, rather than using a IP.

I actually did a ping scan to see latency times and I noticed my original ip address got a better ping time vs the new one I was assigned. Might have been from a recent power outage because I had to reset my router settings as well. I can change it at will between the two gateways. the one ends in 168.1 the other 129.1, so I know there must be different pools open in my area. A few I saw with lower ping times wer ein use, so I couldn't assign myself these addresses, but it woudl be nice to go from like 10-30sec reply to between 2 and 5. Don't kno who wmuch increase in speed it will give me, but I did notice I get a little boost on the one with lower ping time. I also checked them against a speed test using: http://www.speakeasy.net/speedtest/ for an idea of my upload and download speeds. My uploads all get the same speed but my downlaods change on average from 2500 to 2100kbps.

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  • 2 years later...
O_o

Did you even bother to read the (two year old) thread?

THank you! QFE!

Whats with noobs and tyring to raise the dead(threads)?

And please lock the thread, its severly old and irrelavent at this point.

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THank you! QFE!

Whats with noobs and tyring to raise the dead(threads)?

And please lock the thread, its severly old and irrelavent at this point.

This was uncalled for. The fact that you didn't know your public IP changes in my book makes you unfit to call someone a noob. The reason dyndns is around is for this very purpose to let an app like dyndns updater keep track of your IP changes and you not have to worry about it.

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This was uncalled for. The fact that you didn't know your public IP changes in my book makes you unfit to call someone a noob. The reason dyndns is around is for this very purpose to let an app like dyndns updater keep track of your IP changes and you not have to worry about it.

Um, I know my IP changes. In fact, I manually change it on a regular basis. Also, did you read the entire post? I wasn't looking for an IP update service to keep something running on my end, like with dyndns for a home server need, I was contemplating the pools the ISP serves based on speed of an acocunt/paid for service, since some IP addresses seem to yield more speed than others.

The noob comment was on his posting in a thread 2 years old. Its just not exactly needed, especially when his post had nothing to do with the topic I initially posted about nor did it seem he knew what the topic was about. But thanks for your response,<sarcasm> it was MOST helpfull</sarcasm>.

Don't like a reply?
Wasn't about liking/disliking a reply or beign offended(which I wasn't by the way, sorry if it seemed liek I was picking on someone or takign somehting personally - does it even make much difference), it was the relavence to open an old thread with a comment not even applied to the topic.

btw - I like Projectip http://projectip.com/, because I cna also test if im using a proxy(when I need to know it can be detected).

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