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Guest spazi

Well if your a beginner at Python, I read and liked Python for dummies.
After reading that I went ahead and bought "Violent Python" which is not too heavy and is aimed towards pentesting.
I can recommend taking the courses from Udacity and codecademy on python.
Some of it is childplay but makes you memorize stuff :)

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The best programming language is the one that lets you do what you want to do.

It's typically easier to write C than ASM, but if you know ASM and don't know C, the best programming language for you to work in is ASM.

For C programming I will forever stand by the quality work that is Advanced Programming in the UNIX Environment. Link is to the 3rd edition, but any will do. It's a fantastic reference. To learn from scratch... I donno. By the time I got my hands on this book I had already learned most of the language in spite of a complete fucktard teacher who was himself instructed just before class by a different teacher on what he was going to teach us (so questions were, well, difficult for him to answer as he simply didn't know).

For Java programming (you probably won't create your security toolkit with it, but alas) I think the online tuts provided by Oracle are pretty decent so long as you retain a decent focus on what you want to create. So don't learn the language and then decide to create something, decide to create something, work out the concepts a bit and then look at the tuts selectively to figure out which you need. If you simply do all of them you'll be taking an inordinate amount of time to achieve stuff nobody is using anymore.

C# tutorials I have no experience with, but Microsoft provides a number of them and it can't all be that bad. If push comes to shove you could first teach yourself Java and then apply the concepts to .Net as the similarities are extensive, the objects are simply named slightly different.

And Google along with stackoverflow.com are magnificent sources of insight when you run into a snag.

Edited by Cooper
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I got a book, "Java Network Programming" by Elliotte Rusty Harold 4th ed., publisher is O'reilly. I was surprised how easy it was to code a DOS tool after reading about a quarter of the book. Am still reading, is a pretty good read. Not sharing the DOS tool, I think that's against forum rules, but I'd have to check.

...

Appending to this, found out after the fact that most DOS tools only open the beginning of Sockets, so java may not be ideal for this since I am creating full sockets.

Edited by overwraith
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Termbin? Pastebin? Github? Sourceforge?

Your options are legion, even when the forum doesn't allow its posting which, I must admit, would surprise me. I mean, it's just code right now...

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The C Programming Lanauge by Brian W. Kernighan and Dennis M. Ritchie (creator of the C language)

-- This book was my introduction to programming and I must say what I have learned from it has helped me immensely even in other languages. It will teach C but more importantly it will teach you how to write code appropriately. Your code, in every language, will come out cleaner and more efficient if you start with this book, IMHO.

Learning PHP, MySQL, and JavaScript

-- This book was great for learning about PHP and creating dynamic web pages. The book will give you an introduction to MySQL but don't expect it to go too deep. The same goes for JavaScript but it will teach you a good deal of PHP and if you already know C you will find the transition to PHP very simple.

I've read many other books but these too have impacted my work the most. If you want a good resource for downloading PDF versions of books you can look at it-ebooks.info. That's where I get a lot of my books and just put them on my Kindle.

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I'd steer clear of MySQL. When I was in school MySQL wasn't created yet so I was tought Oracle mostly, later Sybase, Informix and MS SQL.

When it comes to free databases, I'm deeply in love with PostgreSQL. MySQL's rather poor track record with SQL92 compliance, in particular at least initially the outright lack of understanding for the concept of transactions made it a useless tool to me.

The thing about databases, much like with programming, is that you need logical structure which in classic database design means the Boyce Codd Normal Form (BCNF). The first resource I found that delves a little into the concept of relational database design is this wikibooks link: http://en.wikibooks.org/wiki/Relational_Database_Design

Since I feel I have a thorough understanding of databases, I've never bothered with actually reading any more books on it so I can't recommend anything on that.

The Kernighan and Ritchie book though is indeed highly recommended.

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I'd steer clear of MySQL. When I was in school MySQL wasn't created yet so I was tought Oracle mostly, later Sybase, Informix and MS SQL.

When it comes to free databases, I'm deeply in love with PostgreSQL. MySQL's rather poor track record with SQL92 compliance, in particular at least initially the outright lack of understanding for the concept of transactions made it a useless tool to me.

The thing about databases, much like with programming, is that you need logical structure which in classic database design means the Boyce Codd Normal Form (BCNF). The first resource I found that delves a little into the concept of relational database design is this wikibooks link: http://en.wikibooks.org/wiki/Relational_Database_Design

Since I feel I have a thorough understanding of databases, I've never bothered with actually reading any more books on it so I can't recommend anything on that.

The Kernighan and Ritchie book though is indeed highly recommended.

Maybe it has been awhile since you last touched MySQL but it supports transactions nowadays. I like PostgreSQL as well. Knowledge in MS SQL is useful but I found a lot of my knowledge from using MySQL helped me my first time on an MS SQL server. And when would I ever require a full instance of MS SQL at home anyway? I use MySQL for a lot of things and prefer it.

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