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In ear headphones


nullArray
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I think, I think I can get past the earwax covered tips and microphonics. However, I can't get past being able to hear every breath/swallow I take in incredible clarity or the like, ear pressure. I can't tell if the pressure is making my music sound muddy or if it always was and I just never noticed.

Anyone else

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I think, I think I can get past the earwax covered tips and microphonics. However, I can't get past being able to hear every breath/swallow I take in incredible clarity or the like, ear pressure. I can't tell if the pressure is making my music sound muddy or if it always was and I just never noticed.

Anyone else

Never had that problem. I find the in-ear have better sound, even with cheap ones. I can't stand the "ear bud" headphones. Took a long time to find a bluetooth headset (Plantronics Voyager 855) that was in-ear. Extra points since it's stereo.

If you can hear you hearbeat, etc. you may have them in too tight. Or try the following:

Before putting them in. Plug your nose, close you mouth and breathe out. This will force your internal air pressure to equalize through you ears. It's an old swimmer/diver trick I learned. Works great on plans and as I kid I would do it when diving down into the deep end in the pool. That way you're ears don't hurt when you're down there.

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Before putting them in. Plug your nose, close you mouth and breathe out. This will force your internal air pressure to equalize through you ears. It's an old swimmer/diver trick I learned. Works great on plans and as I kid I would do it when diving down into the deep end in the pool. That way you're ears don't hurt when you're down there.

If you do this, breathe GENTLY until you feel the change. Don't force it like when you blow your nose.

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Ive always found in-ear to be the best, specially for running, and noise reduction (school).

Though admittedly when i first got them, it was a little weird having lil bubs jammed deep into my ear, but eventualy you get use to them.

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in-ear also ruins your hearing a whole lot quicker. I like my cans (Technics RP-DH1200) a whole lot better. Granted they look like hockey pucks strapped to my head, but hey that's the cost of having a good set of headphones. I pay it gladly :D

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in-ear also ruins your hearing a whole lot quicker. I like my cans (Technics RP-DH1200) a whole lot better. Granted they look like hockey pucks strapped to my head, but hey that's the cost of having a good set of headphones. I pay it gladly :D

Agreed.

nullArray, I think that the act of closing your ears off is always going to result in you hearing your heart and breath. Some people I'm sure are either more prone to sound, or more irritated by it, sounds like you might be both :). If your putting the speakers right in your head, it shouldn't be muddy at all, they might not be the quality you need, or you might be trying to play the music too loud (or both.)

And as a dude who toured in a death metal band for most of my teens, Machstorm is dead on with the ear damage assessment.

For you, I'd recommend a really good set of cans, my test is that if you put the two headphones together, you shouldn't hear very much (or any) music leaking out. This seal will insure you're not getting too much leakage, and therefore don't have to turn up the music higher to compensate for lost sound.

-Brian

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I think, I just need to get used to them. I can only hear my own breathing when the place around me is quiet, but on a bus,..., the noise canceling does a good job eliminating most of the noise around me, and there's just enough to block my breathing.

Cans are amazing, I have a pair of sony noise canceling headphones that were $90 from a closing virgin store or something. They just aren't travel friendly.

As for the hearing damage, I was told that because there is so much cancellation the listener is able to turn the volume down. I find this to be true I suppose. My volume is under half now, when it used to be maxed with earbuds. However, the volume "sounds the same" so is it really better? I'm not sure.

EDIT:

Before putting them in. Plug your nose, close you mouth and breathe out. This will force your internal air pressure to equalize through you ears. It's an old swimmer/diver trick I learned. Works great on plans and as I kid I would do it when diving down into the deep end in the pool. That way you're ears don't hurt when you're down there.

This helped a lot. I always knew that yawning equalized pressure (the Eustachian tubes open up), but I never knew this trick. I'm going on a flight this weekend, so this tip is super.

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