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Pineapple firmware in Tp-Link?


K0B4LT
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People have gotten stuff working on TP-link access points its not hard but the features in the new firmware probably will not work. Specific hardware is needed for it

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Their is i a guide that explains how to install the MK4 firmware on a TP-Link MR3020 http://samiux.blogspot.com/2013/05/howto-tp-link-tl-mr3020-as-wifi.html the new MK5 firmware uses custom hard so possibly wouldn't work with the MK5 firmware.

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There may be more to it, but basically the MkV firmware is stock OpenWRT, the ngix webserver with php support and a ton of scripts to enable functionality. I don't think _that_ much is in there that is hardware-specific. Most of what Seb's been doing is to make those scripts squeeze the most out of the stock tools available on the OpenWRT install. It won't be easy to completely replicate it on alternate hardware simply because the scripts in question may very well assume specific hardware is present and/or capable of performing certain tasks which your hardware may not, but in the grand scheme of things it shouldn't be _that_ hard.

Just don't expect to only have to insert a usb stick in a router, reboot, wait 5 seconds and have a Pineapple MkV for cheap.

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There may be more to it, but basically the MkV firmware is stock OpenWRT, the ngix webserver with php support and a ton of scripts to enable functionality. I don't think _that_ much is in there that is hardware-specific. Most of what Seb's been doing is to make those scripts squeeze the most out of the stock tools available on the OpenWRT install. It won't be easy to completely replicate it on alternate hardware simply because the scripts in question may very well assume specific hardware is present and/or capable of performing certain tasks which your hardware may not, but in the grand scheme of things it shouldn't be _that_ hard.

Just don't expect to only have to insert a usb stick in a router, reboot, wait 5 seconds and have a Pineapple MkV for cheap.

As far as i know from research the MK5 is custom hardware i doubt you will find the same board but i don't wanna open mine to find serial numbers to google but im pretty that hak5 really does have a company that is custom making these MK5's Unlike the MK4 which was basically a Alfa Network AP-121u this MK5 is custom.

Much like the Reaver Pro sold by reaver systems i contacted the manufacturer of the Reaver Pro Box they informed me that the hardware is custom made for that reaver pro. I had a guy who contacted me about his reaver pro getting bricked he wanted to reflash but was having problems so to save him money from having to spend $100 to get a new one i contact patton.com which makes the reaver pro hardware for reaver systems.

I thought like everyone else reaver systems was using a Alfa Network AP-121u but its not the guy i was talking to told me that it has 2x the ROM and RAM that a Alfa Network AP-121u has.

As far as i know you can't get a board with that unless you have it custom made.

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It's a custom board design, but the hardware on top is nothing special.

Do you buy a new Windows when you replace the MSI mobo in your rig with a Gigabyte one? Even though the Gigabyte one doesn't have sound onboard but does come with 2 additional ram slots? Didn't think so.

The OpenWRT folks see to it the hardware is activated and provided to the software in good working order. Unless they patch the OpenWRT kernel (=Linux kernel) to support the MkV (which I like to think I would've noticed when I tried building the firmware from scratch) the only difference should be how the software responds to the lower-level capabilities of the hardware (supporting injection and what have you).

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It's a custom board design, but the hardware on top is nothing special.

Do you buy a new Windows when you replace the MSI mobo in your rig with a Gigabyte one? Even though the Gigabyte one doesn't have sound onboard but does come with 2 additional ram slots? Didn't think so.

The OpenWRT folks see to it the hardware is activated and provided to the software in good working order. Unless they patch the OpenWRT kernel (=Linux kernel) to support the MkV (which I like to think I would've noticed when I tried building the firmware from scratch) the only difference should be how the software responds to the lower-level capabilities of the hardware (supporting injection and what have you).

The board design is custom so how do you think you're gonna be able to get something that is custom made? You'd need to have the board to be able to make your own. Unless you or know someone who can get you the board and parts and do the soldering i don't see you cloning the hardware that easy.

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The board design is custom so how do you think you're gonna be able to get something that is custom made? You'd need to have the board to be able to make your own. Unless you or know someone who can get you the board and parts and do the soldering i don't see you cloning the hardware that easy.

Let me try that again.

The Pineapple firmware is based on OpenWRT, itself a package based on a Linux kernel and a nice batch of software mostly aimed at being compact and written with cross-platform development in mind since OpenWRT is meant to be run on a plethora of different types of hardware, some tight on RAM, storage and CPU horsepower, some using some really weird CPU instruction set and some really big and very capable machines. OpenWRT runs on all of that, including the Pineapple MkV.

What Seb did is take OpenWRT and configure and then compile it in such a way that it runs on the CPU that resides within the Pineapple (which is easy since that same CPU is used by a number of routers which OpenWRT already supports). He looked at it and saw that it was good.

He then proceeded to include a good batch of really useful and interesting tools that we all know and love to run on our own *nix machines. Things like Karma, ssl-strip, things that would turn a router OS into a security research OS. He looked at again and saw that it was good.

But then Seb found that the product was somewhat difficult to use. To get the most out of it required skill and deep knowledge of the tools and how they needed to be invoked such that they would work with the radios present within the MkV. So Seb included a webserver within the OpenWRT package, turned on PHP support, and began work on creating a website that would automate the running of the tools and parse the output of the tools in such a way that they could be presented to the user in a more understandable and consistant fashion. When he was done, he looked at it and once more saw that it was good.

So the argument I'm making is that if you have a router based on the same CPU that's in the MkV and that's capable of being flashed with OpenWRT firmware, you SHOULD be capable of installing the Pineapple MkV firmware on it. The only problem you're liable to get is that the website may very well assume that 2 radios are present as they are in the MkV device which may not be the case with your router. How to deal with that is the only hard part here.

And yeah, K0B4LT, get a Pineapple. It'll cost a bit, but part of that money funds the development of this firmware we all know and love.

Edited by Cooper
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Cooper i get what you're saying but i have yet to see a portable router with dual antenna's and at least one of the chip sets be able to run monitor mode while the other one is able to be as Access Point.

Now yes i guess if you manage to find compatible hardware like that then Yes, you might just be able to run the MK5 firmware on it.

First you must find a compatible board with dual antenna's and capable of 1 antenna serving as a AP the other being about to preform raw frame injection.

If you find that under $100 let me know till then you are stuck with having to buy the MK5 which is well worth buying im not disappointed spending $100 well worth every penny and i would buy again if needed.

One thing i wanna is you may find a compatible device but then the part comes into finding out what the flashing codes are to flash the device with.

Which router has its own address for reading and writeing to the memory i guess if your good with that your covered.

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For $25 you can get an Alfa Hornet board which in the linked version comes with 64MB ram, 16MB flash, 2 LAN ports, a wireless antenna using an I-PEX connector and a USB port. You power it using PoE. If you were to plug into the USB port an RTL8187-based wifi adapter, you get a device that is in essence a Pineapple MkV without the dipswitches and lacking the USB port (since the second radio took it). The I-PEX connector is likely to be inferior to the SMA connectors used on the Pineapple, but the OS doesn't see any of that and you do get a second wired network port. This board is fully supported by OpenWRT.

So, the board costs you 25 bucks.

The RTL8187 adapter will set you back about 10 bucks I would think (a no-name-brand of course, the alfas would cost more, but the Pineapple doesn't come with an alfa, now does it). Let's make it 15 for arguments sake.

The enclosure is something you make yourself out of old CD cases and a bit of glue for all I care. Shouldn't cost you a penny.

Add 10 more bucks for shipping (probably excessive).

That's about $50 for a comparable device.

Your turn.

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For $25 you can get an Alfa Hornet board which in the linked version comes with 64MB ram, 16MB flash, 2 LAN ports, a wireless antenna using an I-PEX connector and a USB port. You power it using PoE. If you were to plug into the USB port an RTL8187-based wifi adapter, you get a device that is in essence a Pineapple MkV without the dipswitches and lacking the USB port (since the second radio took it). The I-PEX connector is likely to be inferior to the SMA connectors used on the Pineapple, but the OS doesn't see any of that and you do get a second wired network port. This board is fully supported by OpenWRT.

So, the board costs you 25 bucks.

The RTL8187 adapter will set you back about 10 bucks I would think (a no-name-brand of course, the alfas would cost more, but the Pineapple doesn't come with an alfa, now does it). Let's make it 15 for arguments sake.

The enclosure is something you make yourself out of old CD cases and a bit of glue for all I care. Shouldn't cost you a penny.

Add 10 more bucks for shipping (probably excessive).

That's about $50 for a comparable device.

Your turn.

To much of a hassle to build it on your own like that i wouldn't be willing to spend the money on a board a case to find out it would require configuring i had a feeling you were gonna try and use an Alfa Network board. Still i asked you to find a board with Dual Antenna's with the same chipsets.

Unless you know how to find the flashing codes for the device its gonna be a hassle the memory address are not the same for the MK5 as they are for that board so that requires more research.

I'll give you credit you found a cheap board that requires work that might work with some work on your own.

However you will need a external wireless card and that isn't too much of a hassle.

I've got other things to do then have a debate about trying to clone the MK5 hardware.

Spend the $99 to support hak5 is all i gotta say.

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I asked you to find a board with Dual Antenna's with the same chipsets.

...which I did. You lost the USB port to get the second chipset. Big whooptidoo. OS won't care.

Unless you know how to find the flashing codes for the device

A Google for "OpenWRT Alfa Hornet" gave this as its top result:

http://wiki.openwrt.org/toh/alfa.network/hornet-ub

There's a complete walkthrough on how to flash the thing. The only step up from that point on is when you get the thing pre-flashed.

I'll give you credit you found a cheap board that requires work that might work with some work on your own.

However you will need a external wireless card and that isn't too much of a hassle.

I've got other things to do then have a debate about trying to clone the MK5 hardware.

My point was that quite literally nothing was preventing you from taking a device that is similar in hardware and flashing it with the MkV firmware, and with a little creativity such a device can be had for less than the price of the pineapple. I think I've proven the latter and provide sufficient pointers to allow a sufficiently capable person to actually make the former happen aswell.

Spend the $99 to support hak5 is all i gotta say.

No arguments there.

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For $25 you can get an Alfa Hornet board which in the linked version comes with 64MB ram, 16MB flash, 2 LAN ports, a wireless antenna using an I-PEX connector and a USB port. You power it using PoE. If you were to plug into the USB port an RTL8187-based wifi adapter, you get a device that is in essence a Pineapple MkV without the dipswitches and lacking the USB port (since the second radio took it). The I-PEX connector is likely to be inferior to the SMA connectors used on the Pineapple, but the OS doesn't see any of that and you do get a second wired network port. This board is fully supported by OpenWRT.

So, the board costs you 25 bucks.

The RTL8187 adapter will set you back about 10 bucks I would think (a no-name-brand of course, the alfas would cost more, but the Pineapple doesn't come with an alfa, now does it). Let's make it 15 for arguments sake.

The enclosure is something you make yourself out of old CD cases and a bit of glue for all I care. Shouldn't cost you a penny.

Add 10 more bucks for shipping (probably excessive).

That's about $50 for a comparable device.

Your turn.

That's basically the Mk 4.

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Barry thats the point i was trying to make to him not hard to make a MK4 but the MK5 is custom hard design im sure their might be a way to make your own MK5 out of another kinda board but im not aware of any board you can buy that is close to what the MK5 has yes you can buy a MK4 board but does it have dual antenna's nope. so basically you're gonna to need hook up a wireless card via the USB port.

Doing that you gotta worry about how stable the device will be with some adapters plugged in to that USB port.

Plus you gotta worry about running out of internal memory after awhile.

All that hassle and money and time to try and make your own MK5 i'd rather just spend the $100 MK5 hak5 sells well worth it i love it even if it had none of the infusions and just the stuff hak5 offers in it is still worth.

Very fun to introduce people to the pineapple for the first time and them be mind blown what can be done with it.

I've shown it to many people and companies where i live im surprised how many people in my home town are not aware of this. But seeing people running WEP doesn't surprise me.

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  • 10 months later...

Anyone here managed to get Pineapple firmware running on something like a TP-Link router? I've been trying with a TP-Link MR3020 the last couple of days, but not really getting anywhere. Seems like a lot of these tutorials have errors in them and that's just complicating it more.

Any specific device that's known to work properly?

PS: I would love to buy a proper Wifi Pineapple, but unfortunately they don't ship to South Africa.

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Anyone here managed to get Pineapple firmware running on something like a TP-Link router? I've been trying with a TP-Link MR3020 the last couple of days, but not really getting anywhere. Seems like a lot of these tutorials have errors in them and that's just complicating it more.

Any specific device that's known to work properly?

PS: I would love to buy a proper Wifi Pineapple, but unfortunately they don't ship to South Africa.

Read the last four or five posts.

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You can make a Mark 4 pretty easy all you need to do is go on ebay or amazon and search for Alfa network ap-121u flash the stock firmware to openwrt once you have openwrt then flash with the mark 4 lastest firmware from their you will have a Mark 4.

Making a Mark 5 is not something i can say i can do because its custom hardware so unless you can find the board hak5 uses and maybe if you're lucky you won't need to do any soldering lol.

I was told they even custom make the USB Rubber ducky like someone honestly sits there and solders each ducky from what my friend claims he says the way his was soldered it was done by a human not a robot.

By the way i was gonna work on making my own Mark 4 2 years ago using i think a TP-LINK MR3040 i kept getting it bricked following some guide i literally throw it at the wall and never worked on it again serious anger issues i had that day but been meaning to get another one just $40 is a bit much for something i have no use for :B

You could honestly just buy a Raspberry Pi 2 and install Kali Linux to it and then install http://www.fruitywifi.com/index_eng.html :B

Edited by ZaraByte
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You can make a Mark 4 pretty easy all you need to do is go on ebay or amazon and search for Alfa network ap-121u flash the stock firmware to openwrt once you have openwrt then flash with the mark 4 lastest firmware from their you will have a Mark 4.

Making a Mark 5 is not something i can say i can do because its custom hardware so unless you can find the board hak5 uses and maybe if you're lucky you won't need to do any soldering lol.

I was told they even custom make the USB Rubber ducky like someone honestly sits there and solders each ducky from what my friend claims he says the way his was soldered it was done by a human not a robot.

By the way i was gonna work on making my own Mark 4 2 years ago using i think a TP-LINK MR3040 i kept getting it bricked following some guide i literally throw it at the wall and never worked on it again serious anger issues i had that day but been meaning to get another one just $40 is a bit much for something i have no use for :B

You could honestly just buy a Raspberry Pi 2 and install Kali Linux to it and then install http://www.fruitywifi.com/index_eng.html :B

I've managed to setup my MR3020 as a Karma router, will have a look for the Alfa one, thanks.

Already started playing around with fruitywifi, seems about the closest I'll get to a Pineapple.

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