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You Don't Know Admiral Hopper?


Pwnd2Pwnr
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Ok, this is a forum of learning. Do anyone of you people know who Admiral Hopper is? If ya don't, you need to gracefully read up on your history. :)~

Ada Lovelace, on the other hand, may be a bit obscure. ANYWAY, if someone wants to chime in on some programming/internet history, let's post it.

We not lest forget the ones who made computers, and the first LADY who wrote its programming.

Sure, you may know your programming, you may know everything about your motherboard, you may be able to network a server with a blind fold. But, the history of computing and programming are being lost because kids would rather jump to "hacking", rather than how these became possible.

Chime in, who else made significant strides in computing (we all know Grace wrote COBOL)... who else should be added?

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Charles Babbage and the differential machine, which essentially was the first "computer" or theory/model for data computation built into a physical machine. Between Babbage and Lovelace, thats where computing and algorithms began, long before the idea of a computer existed in the terms we think of today.

Funny note, if you watch the movie Hackers, the last scene of the movie where "The Plague" gets arrested in his old man disguise, his alias is Mr Babbage, an homage to Charles Babbage of course.

Edited by digip
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The machine Charles Babbage looks more intricate than most devices nowadays.

Here is another good one, Dick Stallman... besides you, Digip :), does anyone know who he is? I bet a good number google his name then tell me, but how did he play a role in modern computing?

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If we're just name dropping... Newton, Leibniz, Tesla, Church, Turing, Ritchie, Kernighan, Knuth, McCarthy, Pike, Thompson, Wozniak, Raymond, Torvalds, Volkerding, Rossum, Matz, Armstrong, Stroustrup...

Is that enough? Is my e-peen big enough for you?

Topics like this are kind of lame. If you want to discuss something just discuss it, don't try to test us or make assumptions about what we do or don't know. I found the tone of the original post to be condescending, especially coming from someone who's own authority on the subject matter has not clearly been established.

The hacker community is actually rather remarkable in how familiar we are with our own history. It has been the subject of some research and thesis papers.

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Has rms stopped playing a role in modern computing? I must have missed that memo.

I wish. More and more I feel like he is becoming a liability rather than a leader. I kind of want him to quietly disappear, or to just shut up and put his code where his mouth is.

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If we're just name dropping... Newton, Leibniz, Tesla, Church, Turing, Ritchie, Kernighan, Knuth, McCarthy, Pike, Thompson, Wozniak, Raymond, Torvalds, Volkerding, Rossum, Matz, Armstrong, Stroustrup...

Is that enough? Is my e-peen big enough for you?

Topics like this are kind of lame. If you want to discuss something just discuss it, don't try to test us or make assumptions about what we do or don't know. I found the tone of the original post to be condescending, especially coming from someone who's own authority on the subject matter has not clearly been established.

The hacker community is actually rather remarkable in how familiar we are with our own history. It has been the subject of some research and thesis papers.

OK... this was never meant to be crass or negative, to be clear. I do not know how you heard my tone, as this is a qwerty conversation. I was just compiling what some people may/may not know. I thought this forum was intended for learning, correct? I am sorry for coming across rudely...

There was not a history thread, so I thought, "Hey, let's get the collective minds going....". I did not realize that I was starting problems. Sitwon, instead of making me look like an ass, how about you detail someone from your list and how they contributed. If it is "lame", then don't post on this thread. I am sure others wouldn't mind to read up on this...

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I think Richard Stallman gets a bad rap from a lot of people because he is so adamant about FOSS, but at times he does like to poke the eye of Closed Source companies like Microsoft. I think people forget that fact that most of what people use today in Linux, aside from its Kernel, is largely supported by what he started with GNU and wanting to give people the freedom to create and share unfettered by EULA's and "you bought this computer, but we own the OS no matter what" mentality. In a way, Linux wouldn't be where it is today without both him and Torvalds, so all the people out there using various Linux programs(and many other programs written to run under Windows, Linux and Apple products) owe the man some respect for what he has done and offered to the world, for free.

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Here is a juicy tid-bit... Nikolai Tesla invented the remote control... too bad DC never took off; could you imagine how different electronics would be if Edison didn't have the political power (and, of course, money).

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I'd like to get a direct answer on the origin of the internet, or at least TCP/IP or client/server connections. I've heard some people say the internet was invented at Bell Labs, some say it was a post WW2 invention of the military, some say it was a way that academics communicated with one another in the 60's and 70's, I even saw a documentary not long ago about some guy at Google claiming he invented it (though I think that no one person can take responsibility). I even remember when Al Gore tried to take credit for it (lol).

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Wired communication predates the Internet, and TCP/IP has a creator, who I think passed away last year, but in general, it was an academic thing that they tried sending messages back and forth between two devices or terminals in different rooms which lead way to the development of the Arpanet and then the Internet. It goes back to the idea of packet switching, something recent covered on the show with Ham radio and sending SMS and Email over radio using Packet Switching, which is what the original "networks" used. TCP/IP and all that stuff came much later and most everything in the beginning was more or less what we consider layers 1 and 2 today of the OSI model, and not routable as much as it was just broadcast data between all nodes. Back then it was the "DOD" model, and I believe had another protocol in use before the invention of TCP and the IP stuff. Bell labs helped develop a lot of the later stuff with regard to the operating systems and equipment to help do the communications and terminal stuff, but for the most part was built by the colleges for the Department of Defense and progressed from there. Thats my recollection of things I've read over the years and some of it is based on stuff I learned in school, but if you want to know, there are probably tons of books on the subject.

Who remembers RTM (Robert Tappin Morse? forget the guys name) and the first Internet Worm? From what I remember, he was the son of a Bell Labs employee who had access to terminals at home as a young child, and learned to program on them. By the time he hit his teens, I think sometime around college, he developed a worm, by accident, which initially was intended to see how many machines he could reach from one node and receive messages back from each node, and instead, within hours of writing his code, had more or less taken down the entire internet, or whatever it was at that time(Darpanet/Arpanet, not sure). I have a book on him somewhere in the house, that had stories about him, Mitnick and a few others which was some cyberpunk book I had picked up like late 90's and talked about the early internet, phone systems, etc, and how all of that lead to Unix and such.

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Al Gore... lol... haven't heard that name in a while... (thank god)!

The Academia, as far as I have read, basically gave the credit to the NAVY for the invention. Computers then were a lot like the switch boards for Ma Bell, a lot of wiring and switching of wires. I also read that the US Government was not going to release it to the general public. The Internet was designed for keeping lines of communication open for apocalyptic/catastrophic events... at least that is what I read in elementary school (late 80s, early 90s). Wow... I still hear the sound of the modems' scream (deeeee-deeeee-duuuhhhh-duhh-duhh)...

Edited by Pwnd2Pwnr
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Wired communication predates the Internet, and TCP/IP has a creator, who I think passed away last year, but in general, it was an academic thing that they tried sending messages back and forth between two devices or terminals in different rooms which lead way to the development of the Arpanet and then the Internet. It goes back to the idea of packet switching, something recent covered on the show with Ham radio and sending SMS and Email over radio using Packet Switching, which is what the original "networks" used. TCP/IP and all that stuff came much later and most everything in the beginning was more or less what we consider layers 1 and 2 today of the OSI model, and not routable as much as it was just broadcast data between all nodes. Back then it was the "DOD" model, and I believe had another protocol in use before the invention of TCP and the IP stuff. Bell labs helped develop a lot of the later stuff with regard to the operating systems and equipment to help do the communications and terminal stuff, but for the most part was built by the colleges for the Department of Defense and progressed from there. Thats my recollection of things I've read over the years and some of it is based on stuff I learned in school, but if you want to know, there are probably tons of books on the subject.

Who remembers RTM (Robert Tappin Morse? forget the guys name) and the first Internet Worm? From what I remember, he was the son of a Bell Labs employee who had access to terminals at home as a young child, and learned to program on them. By the time he hit his teens, I think sometime around college, he developed a worm, by accident, which initially was intended to see how many machines he could reach from one node and receive messages back from each node, and instead, within hours of writing his code, had more or less taken down the entire internet, or whatever it was at that time(Darpanet/Arpanet, not sure). I have a book on him somewhere in the house, that had stories about him, Mitnick and a few others which was some cyberpunk book I had picked up like late 90's and talked about the early internet, phone systems, etc, and how all of that lead to Unix and such.

I was affected from the AT&T blackout... lol... memories!

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Here is a juicy tid-bit... Nikolai Tesla invented the remote control... too bad DC never took off; could you imagine how different electronics would be if Edison didn't have the political power (and, of course, money).

Every town would have to have at least 1 power plant. DC just doesn't go that far.

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