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Suggestions For New Access Point / Router.


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I need a new router. My current one is the old wrt54g. I just got some wifi bluray players for watching streaming netflix, and the one farthest from the router/ap gets a weak signal and so its very slow. I have one machine on my network that has a pci 802.11g card, so i need the router to support that until i get a new pci card that supports 802.11n. I want my new one to work at 5Ghz. Suggestions?

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Either build your own, or get a Linksys E2000. They are reliable, have bg and n, and should be fast enough while not breaking the bank.

Edited by digip
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The E2000 is pretty close to what I want, but I forgot to mention that I need to have at least one, preferably two, USB ports. One USB and one SATA would be fine too. Having two USB is not a must since I can still use the printer over network without connecting it directly to the router, but I have to have the USB or SATA for network attached storage, unless there is a better way to do that?

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The E2000 is pretty close to what I want, but I forgot to mention that I need to have at least one, preferably two, USB ports. One USB and one SATA would be fine too. Having two USB is not a must since I can still use the printer over network without connecting it directly to the router, but I have to have the USB or SATA for network attached storage, unless there is a better way to do that?

No USB or eSATA ports on it. So that might be an issue. Does your NAS device have ethernet on it? USB would be slower anyway, since this router has gigabit ports as well. USB tops out at 480mb/sec and real world throughput for a NAS over USB would probably be less than half that. Most NAS and RAID boxes that use USB are much slower than their ethernet and eSATA versions.

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No USB or eSATA ports on it. So that might be an issue. Does your NAS device have ethernet on it? USB would be slower anyway, since this router has gigabit ports as well. USB tops out at 480mb/sec and real world throughput for a NAS over USB would probably be less than half that. Most NAS and RAID boxes that use USB are much slower than their ethernet and eSATA versions.

I don't have a NAS box yet. I've been thinking about getting one, but I've known that my router is on it's way out for a while, so I've been waiting until I get the router to buy the NAS, this way I have more options on which NAS as well as which router I can get. I will use the NAS's HDD to backup critical data from all of my machines, and it will also be used to do a complete bit for bit image of one machine's HDD. I want to be able to connect the NAS's HDD to that one machine using SATA so that it won't take 6 hours to image. So if I can get a router that has SATA, as well as a NAS solution that has SATA, while completely avoiding USB altogether, I will be happy.

Any new advice based on this info?

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I don't know of any router that has eSATA. If you want this, best to build a home router like Darren did, and use a micro atx board that has eSATA on the mobo. I have however seen storage devices that have ethernet built in, and that would be my suggestion vs a router with usb or such.

Edited by digip
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I don't know of any router that has eSATA. If you want this, best to build a home router like Darren did, and use a micro atx board that has eSATA on the mobo. I have however seen storage devices that have ethernet built in, and that would be my suggestion vs a router with usb or such.

The only interfaces you will get out of conventional routers are USB and Ethernet ports. If you need E-sata you better build your own router, the choices for a router software are PFsense or Untangle.

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I don't know of any router that has eSATA. If you want this, best to build a home router like Darren did, and use a micro atx board that has eSATA on the mobo. I have however seen storage devices that have ethernet built in, and that would be my suggestion vs a router with usb or such.

I guess I'm just gonna have to go with USB NAS, as I'm not sure about imaging a HDD over ethernet. Maybe I could get a NAS enclosure that connects to the router via a USB port, and connects to the actual HDD via SATA, that way I could take the disk out of its enclosure and write an image to it using SATA?

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I guess I'm just gonna have to go with USB NAS, as I'm not sure about imaging a HDD over ethernet. Maybe I could get a NAS enclosure that connects to the router via a USB port, and connects to the actual HDD via SATA, that way I could take the disk out of its enclosure and write an image to it using SATA?

If you want to image a computer over the network look into these technologies RIS or SCCM. Also read through these articles to understand the process of how it works.

http://support.microsoft.com/kb/298750

Installing RIS on a windows server 2003

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If you want to image a computer over the network look into these technologies RIS or SCCM. Also read through these articles to understand the process of how it works.

http://support.microsoft.com/kb/298750

Installing RIS on a windows server 2003

That's cool stuff! Now that I know the standards and tech exist, I have to learn how to use it.

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Ubiquiti RouterStation Pro and pick whatever cards you want from them, there all good.

That's some tasty hardware, though I don't think I am well versed enough to put to practical use the more obscure hardware and software such as the RouterStation Pro. I think it's just slightly past my level of understanding (being able to put it to practical use, that is). For example, I don't begin to understand why it uses +40VDC - +56VDC, or why it has RS232 support, or why it would need two radios, could I add a daughter board for e-SATA support, would there be limitations as to which kind of daughter boards I could install, where is a person supposed to come across a case for such a board.......and so on. I have a hard time coming across interesting tech and then not being compelled to learn all there is to know about it. Which reminds me...........

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That's some tasty hardware, though I don't think I am well versed enough to put to practical use the more obscure hardware and software such as the RouterStation Pro. I think it's just slightly past my level of understanding (being able to put it to practical use, that is). For example, I don't begin to understand why it uses +40VDC - +56VDC, or why it has RS232 support, or why it would need two radios, could I add a daughter board for e-SATA support, would there be limitations as to which kind of daughter boards I could install, where is a person supposed to come across a case for such a board.......and so on. I have a hard time coming across interesting tech and then not being compelled to learn all there is to know about it. Which reminds me...........

Without even looking at the device mentioned, usually RS232 on routers is because out of the box you need to connect to them over serial to set them up. Cisco routers(not consumer routers but high end cisco equipment) for example require console access over serial, and connection using putty on a terminal server or hyperterminal directly via a com port. They have adapters these days that do usb to serial for the same thing since most modern PC's don't have serial com ports any longer. Especially small netbooks.

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Without even looking at the device mentioned, usually RS232 on routers is because out of the box you need to connect to them over serial to set them up. Cisco routers(not consumer routers but high end cisco equipment) for example require console access over serial, and connection using putty on a terminal server or hyperterminal directly via a com port. They have adapters these days that do usb to serial for the same thing since most modern PC's don't have serial com ports any longer. Especially small netbooks.

Well that makes sense I guess. I don't understand why they need to be connected by serial to be set up. By "setup" do you mean installing an OS and giving it the correct settings and such? This sounds like something that's more trouble than it would be worth for most individuals. The hardware also includes on board USB standard, so considering the commonplace of USB, why wouldn't they just use the USB for setup?

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Well that makes sense I guess. I don't understand why they need to be connected by serial to be set up. By "setup" do you mean installing an OS and giving it the correct settings and such? This sounds like something that's more trouble than it would be worth for most individuals. The hardware also includes on board USB standard, so considering the commonplace of USB, why wouldn't they just use the USB for setup?

Its just another way to manage or configure them, instead of using a web-based interface you generally use a command line interface and that's why a serial cable is required.

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While we are on the subject, is there any incremental performance boost in building your own router?

I'd like to think there would be but I'm not so sure.

I know I can Google this and get a reply in a few seconds but I'd love to hear your guys.

Thanks

-Remotesh

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Its just another way to manage or configure them, instead of using a web-based interface you generally use a command line interface and that's why a serial cable is required.

It seems like a redundant and obsolete way of doing things, especially if the hardware is capable interface through USB. I can't remember the last time I saw a computer with an RS232 port. I read something a while back that said that there is some very old and extremely expensive specialty hardware out there that was made when the RS232 was popular, and that some new hardware still uses RS232 so that it is compatible with that very old and very expensive to replace hardware. Could that be the case here?

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