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USB THUMB DRIVE ERROR.


tito86
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Hello,

I have a thumb drive that I got from a friend, but the reason he gave it to is because it doesn't work.  It shows up as a "removable disk (E:) device", but I'm unable to open it.  .  i was wondering if anyone had a a tool program to fix this problem.  I tried reformatting the thumb drive, but nothing seems to work.  . . 

thanks,

Tito86

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Hello,

I have a thumb drive that I got from a friend, but the reason he gave it to is because it doesn't work.  It shows up as a "removable disk (E:) device", but I'm unable to open it.  .  i was wondering if anyone had a a tool program to fix this problem.  I tried reformatting the thumb drive, but nothing seems to work.  . . 

thanks,

Tito86

Have you tried to open the drive with a Hex editor to see if it can see any data at all? Was it defintately his or could he have swiped it? I wonder if it  may have an encrypted volume on it. But most likely it is probably broken(or past it's ability to read and write to the device).

Flash drives only have a short life span, with only so many writes possible to it before it can't retain data any more and then they start to malfunction.

Weaknesses

Like all flash memory devices, flash drives can sustain only a limited number of write and erase cycles before failure. Mid-range flash drives under normal conditions will support several hundred thousand cycles, although write operations will gradually slow as the device ages. This should be a consideration when using a flash drive to run application software or an operating system. To address this, as well as space limitations, some developers have produced special versions of operating systems (such as Linux) or commonplace applications (such as Mozilla Firefox) designed to run from flash drives. These are typically optimized for size and configured to place temporary or intermediate files in the computer's main RAM rather than store them temporarily on the flash drive.

Most USB flash drives do not include a write-protect mechanism, although some have a switch on the housing of the drive itself to keep the host computer from writing or modifying data on the drive. Write-protection makes a device suitable for repairing virus-contaminated host computers without risk of infecting the USB flash drive itself.

In some USB flash drives, the USB interface is bigger than the storing body.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/USB_flash_drive

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