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Video card not recognizing monitor after I switched CPU cases.


leetninja
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i have to say am having simular issues but i dint changed cases or anything but mine problem was weird bc mah computer was working earlier on the day i booted fine and the next time i started the computer i saw no video and ended up RMA the motherboard and i just it back had the same issues and i also changed the PSU still having the same issue am sure that its either a memory issue or the processor

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The static thing is BS in my expirence. I've taped a SODIMM to my sock and skated across a nylon carpet (don't ask... it was a complex warranty extension scam my boss asked me to do). It still passed memtest. And it still booted windows perfectly after I took a box cutter, removed some resistors and cut some of the copper tracks.

However I have come across people who do honestly believe this. There was once a lecturer at a university i attended/worked for who upon discovering his laptop memory had been upgraded without the use of a anti-static wrist band, demanded that he be issued a brand new machine and came to watch a 2nd memory upgrade.

Generally I take care to earth myself though, it probally won't damage anything but why not do it anyway? It might be a superstition but its not a bad one.

As for you current problem its more likely that if you damaged the hardware you managed to flex the motherboard somewhat and broke some of the tracks. I've done this before by being careless and screwing something down to much or pushing a connector in with to much force. Sometimes you can find a sweet spot pressure wise where it works, but it will never be right again. But even more likely is that you have a short somewhere.

What I would recommend it striping everything down, dust/clean it all, reapply thermal paste. Then build it outside of the case. Start with just enough kit to reach BIOS (mobo, graphics & keyboard) and see how far you get. Keep adding components until it either falls over or you run out. Once you have confirmed if its working or not you can move on to carefully rebuilding it inside the case,

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What I would recommend it striping everything down, dust/clean it all, reapply thermal paste. Then build it outside of the case. Start with just enough kit to reach BIOS (mobo, graphics & keyboard) and see how far you get. Keep adding components until it either falls over or you run out. Once you have confirmed if its working or not you can move on to carefully rebuilding it inside the case,

Thanks for all of the info on what could have gone wrong, VaKo, and all of you guys.

Unfortunately, what I've come to is what you have explained above, which will be time consuming. I'm going to try taking out the battery, then go to this last resort. I'll keep you guys posted if anything good happens.

If you guys have any suggestions, they are still needed. (I just don't understand why the fans and everything would still be working.)

"Many semiconductor devices used in electronics are extremely sensitive to the presence of static electricity and can be damaged by a static discharge." -Wiki god. ....Thanks for that detailed info.

[edit]

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I just don't understand why the fans and everything would still be working.

The fans are probably connected directly (perhaps via a fan controller/voltage regulator that assumes a default speed/voltage when not other wise instructed) to the 12v power rails from the power supply on the 20/24 pin connector. As soon as the power on/off sub system of the motherboard is told to turn the power supply on (because some one press the power button) it activates the PSU which spins up the fans regardless of any thing else.

If this be the case (I see no reason as to why not) then the only way the fans would never spin is if the motherboard refused to turn the PSU on. At a stab in the dark I would guess this function of the motherboard is almost entirely done in hardware (simple relays) and would be less susceptible to a static charge than, for example, the north or south bridge chips.

If it was the case that the motherboard refused to turn on the power supply it might be worth forcing the PSU on with a paper clip just to see if the motherboard other wise works.

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If it was the case that the motherboard refused to turn on the power supply it might be worth forcing the PSU on with a paper clip just to see if the motherboard other wise works.

Okay, where will this place be that I stick the paper clip in?

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i just want to clarify.. is it a different Power supply then the old one? and what is the Wattage.. maybe you don't have enough power for it.. just a thought..

Yes, it is. I'm at work right now, but I will find out the wattage ASAP.

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Okay, where will this place be that I stick the paper clip in?

Poke one end of a paperclip intro any of the black pins on the motherboard connector, and poke the other end into the green pin of the motherboard connector. The PSU should spring to life.

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Try rebuilding it outside the case. My money is on a short somewhere, or that you have damaged the motherboard while moving it (but this is less likely). Its not that time consuming, it will take you a couple of hours at most.

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Try rebuilding it outside the case. My money is on a short somewhere, or that you have damaged the motherboard while moving it (but this is less likely). Its not that time consuming, it will take you a couple of hours at most.

I know this sounds like I'm trying to be ridiculous and rude, but I'm not: Why would rebuilding it out of the case do anything different?

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I know this sounds like I'm trying to be ridiculous and rude, but I'm not: Why would rebuilding it out of the case do anything different?

if the case is silly (could be) it might be causes a short on the motherboard, building it on a non conductive wooden surface (for example) eliminates that possibility.

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if the case is silly (could be) it might be causes a short on the motherboard, building it on a non conductive wooden surface (for example) eliminates that possibility.

That could possibly be it, but I've used the case before and it worked fine? Although, like I think you're saying, it could just be that motherboard with that case.

By the way, I switched the 300w PSU out with a 350w PSU just in case, but still no luck.

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Very simple reason. You currently have a broken computer and its much harder to troubleshoot everything all at once than splitting it into logical steps. The case is the new thing in a previously stable system, and although it won't be incompatible, at this point you need to test that the computer still boots before trying work out why it won't boot in the new case. So, by taking everything apart and rebuilding it on a non-conductive surface you get a clearer picture of what bits work and what doesn't. No, its not essential to do it this way, but you have been pissing about with this for days now. See if the important bits still work, if so rebuild inside the case, but take more care this time around. If they don't, hit up ebay.

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That could possibly be it, but I've used the case before and it worked fine? Although, like I think you're saying, it could just be that motherboard with that case.

By the way, I switched the 300w PSU out with a 350w PSU just in case, but still no luck.

300/350w is pretty low wattage. What are the specs of your system?

Not to be stupid but have you tried a different monitor? Though if you don't get any beeps it means your system isn't getting past POST.

When a system boots:

1. Power On

2. BIOS Loads

3. POST

5. Boot Loader

6. Operating System Loads

The system should beep somewhere between Step 1 and the end of Step 3.

Can You please explain more about your system. Explain exactly what all the parts of your system are and where they came from (original computer, other computer, new, etc)?

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Can You please explain more about your system. Explain exactly what all the parts of your system are and where they came from (original computer, other computer, new, etc)?

yah... and i have seen some psu that didn't have the 4 pin power unit that goes somewhere around the cpu... do you have one of them???

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300/350w is pretty low wattage. What are the specs of your system?

Not to be stupid but have you tried a different monitor? Though if you don't get any beeps it means your system isn't getting past POST.

When a system boots:

1. Power On

2. BIOS Loads

3. POST

5. Boot Loader

6. Operating System Loads

The system should beep somewhere between Step 1 and the end of Step 3.

Can You please explain more about your system. Explain exactly what all the parts of your system are and where they came from (original computer, other computer, new, etc)?

Yes, I have tried a different monitor, but thanks.

No, I don't have any beeps, so I guess I'm screwed.

All of the parts that I have are from multiple other old computers that I have received over time from repairing computers (mostly junk that people are throwing away). But, I decided to put all of the junk together to make a decent Linux/XP machine.

Some specs:

RAM--768mb

HD--60gb

Video Card--ATI Radeon 9000 64M DDR TVO

All of these things were together in the other computer, including the MB. So, It must be the case, PSU, or a fried MB.

I will post MB specs when I later...sorry.

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yah... and i have seen some psu that didn't have the 4 pin power unit that goes somewhere around the cpu... do you have one of them???

Nope.

Just to let you guys know, this isn't a HUGE deal, so for those of you who have grown weary of this topic, you're more than welcome to leave. It's just fun--to me at least--to figure out what's wrong with something.

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