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becoming teh guru


edman2478411
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HEy guys i'm your average computer geek and over the past couple of years i've been discovering more and more computer stuff that well i never knew existed and the thing is that i want to learn all of it but i dont know where to start. I'm doing good in learning some programming languages, and learning my hardware inside out i just don't know where to go from there.I've got tons of knowledge already but wow there is so much more i;ve seen that i want to actually understand. can anybody point me in the right direction.

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I bought a 10TB HD (at £200, I know, I was surprised too).

Are u sure?

Well I’m guessing this is all stored in a data centre somewhere and he is just a reseller. I have well over 10TB of storage in my house (cost a lot more then £200) and have done a lot of jobs in the IT industry but £200 a month is not to bad if you’re getting insurances against data loss from fire, flood, terrorism and other things. Disaster recovery plans are a key part of any medium to large company.

No one knows hardware inside out, technology is always changing you may know a lot but you never know everything. Even old information is over looked by a lot of people like binary, octal and hexadecimal arithmetic (you should be able to do it in your head) or even something as simple as knowing what and being able to explain what the Fetch-Decode-Execute Cycle is.

All I can tell anyone to do is read.

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yea, but 10tb in one hdd?

Oh, it was 10 1TB HD's I made into a RAID.

:) ok thats more belivable, i was starting to think that Aus was just that outta the loop!, atm the biggest HDD's stocked in store is 500gb, though if need be, we can order in 1Tb's though take about 1week <_< :( my server feels so small now, im only running 4Tb  :-(

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Words of Wisdom: Tech people are just regular people that know how to find and read documentation.

The best thing you can do is READ THE DIRECTIONS.  Even if its for a product you will never use, just read the directions and information about the device or software, you will learn a lot the will apply to other devices and software.

My dad rushes through everything and the gets pissed when it doesn't work.  Then i have to read the directions for him and fix it. 

If people only took a few minutes to read the instructions and try and understand what they are doing instead of just jumping into a project you will get it done a lot faster and you will only have to do it once

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If you are going to get into networking I would suggest some light reading. Here are some titles that I have read and I have gained a lot insight into networking.

TCP/IP Network Administration   -3rd edition  -O'Reilly  -- The basics of networking

IP Routing             -O'Reilly                                             -- More advanced topics on protocols and packet routing

Network Security Assessment         -O'Reilly                  -- This points out where the weaknesses are in networks and tells to you how to secure them.

I know that it looks like I am an O'Reilly fanboy but the books are awesome.

Also if you already know or already have an A+ cert. then getting

Exam Cram 2   A+ second edition  by Jones Landes    - This is a good reference book in case you aren't in arm's length of google.  :-)

                                                                                               I have yet to need it because it doesn't go to far into how RAID setups will

                                                                                                effect different windows installs and things of that nature.

If you work at a company who has a partnership with apple take their apple sale's training. You lean a lot about their products. Even if you don't like apples they have some sweet ass network RAID drives. You also can learn from simple online product training that company's like D-link, Netgear, and Linksys give out from time to time.

Depending on how old you are you could get a tech job at a large corp. Even though a lot of people shit talk Geeksquad they do give out a lot free training. Most of it is sales based, but you can learn a some stuff. Also you get the experience encountering different problems that will enhance your understanding of things. Unfortunitly you will get your share of getting yelled at and having short fat women telling you that you that you don't know shit, but hey life moves on and no matter what anyone says you know what you know.

But I agree with what was said above. "to truly become a guru one must realize that they will never know all the answers. Knowing how to find the answers is more important. Then you will truly grok"   

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wow guys thanks a lot i'm working on A+ as we speak i took this certification test at experttraining.com it was hard but i passed thanks again

Good Job!  :grin:

If your looking to continue on with that line of Computer study, i suggest Cisco's Certified Network Administrator (CCNA), its well worth it, if network is your game.

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wow guys thanks a lot i'm working on A+ as we speak i took this certification test at experttraining.com it was hard but i passed thanks again

Good Job!  :grin:

If your looking to continue on with that line of Computer study, i suggest Cisco's Certified Network Administrator (CCNA), its well worth it, if network is your game.

So deveant how do we cheat on that one? :-P

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I'm beginning to get ready to change jobs.  At the moment I'm responsible for implementing, maintaining and improving a bunch of secure standalone LAN's.  I'm very lucky to be doing the job I currently do as I've got no formal IT qualifications, I just happened to grow up around computers. 

Anyway, to the point.  The company I work for will pay for me to attend some IT courses as a kind of thank you before I leave them.  I've seen A+ and CCNA mentioned so far as good courses.  After looking at the A+ syllabus it looks a bit basic for the experience I've gathered so far.  I was looking at starting with Network+ as a refresher and then going onto Security+ with a bit of CCNA and CCDA thrown in for good measure.  As an after thought I was going to look at doing an MCP sitting the Server 2003 exam. 

Does anyone have any other suggestions for course bearing in mind that I'm hoping to move into the world of designing, implementing and possibly pen testing secure networks?

As a side note, has anyone done the Certified Ethical Hacker course? I'm not looking at doing it just yet as I need to get a bit of experience prior to doing this, just wanting to get a feel for it. 

Bit of a bizzare first post.  Should of got on here earlier seeing as I've been watchin Hak.  5 since the beginning.  Ah well 8)

Shifty

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