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"Extending" a network?


Dijit
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Hey you guys, I j/w about something...

I have an old dell Inspiron 4000 Laptop that has two PCMCIA slots

I use one of the slots for my wireless network card, If I bought another card could it connect to my "Inner" network and feed the internet through like a Firewall?

and If it can, what kind of software do I need?

any help is greatly apreciated

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Windows will do it via ICS, and linux or BSD will do it if you set it up to be a router. Don't suppose you could give us a tad more info on the situation?

sorry dude, well.... I have a wireless router (lynksys) connected to an Internet connection... It broadcasts to about half the area I need it too. (I play a LOT of lan parties' and such with ppl in the niebourhood)

My Main PC well... My desktop sits In the other side of my house (In my bedroom) to The "Connected" router, It also sits with another Router (Belkin) that Is'nt connected to the Internet

so... I wanted to use my Laptop as a Medium (it's running Win XP and has Ubuntu installed aswell)  so I could expand my Broadcast area, and also connect to my Desktop... so I don't have to sit so near the router on my Crappy Lappy

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Sorry Bout the Double post...

anyway, I've started doing this... and it's not going so well... I have Like 2 PC's linked by RJ45 headed Cables... and the rest By wi-fi (to the Belkin)

and I'm not getting a net connection on any of them... I've urned off firewalls and such and I've also set the ICMP to allow all... not it's talking about bridging the connection to the net based one.. but I'd need another wifi card

I also tried to be sneaky and use remote desktop to logg me in o the P3 server (wannabe) but it won't go through the network...

so, what I'm really asking is... If I bridge the connection, will my problems be solved?

when I phrase it like that it dosent seem likely, but I'm running out of options, and fast!

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Sorry Bout the Double post...

anyway, I've started doing this... and it's not going so well... I have Like 2 PC's linked by RJ45 headed Cables... and the rest By wi-fi (to the Belkin)

and I'm not getting a net connection on any of them... I've urned off firewalls and such and I've also set the ICMP to allow all... not it's talking about bridging the connection to the net based one.. but I'd need another wifi card

I also tried to be sneaky and use remote desktop to logg me in o the P3 server (wannabe) but it won't go through the network...

so, what I'm really asking is... If I bridge the connection, will my problems be solved?

when I phrase it like that it dosent seem likely, but I'm running out of options, and fast!

Bridged connections generally allow you to use two or more network cards as if they were one, like an ethernet and a wireless on the same lan. Its supposedly used to boost your connect speed meant to say boost your lan speed by connecting directly to another pc, but havent gotten it work myself...And it does not work for win2000 or older. XP SP2 and above work though.

http://www.microsoft.com/resources/documen...ge_install.mspx

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ok, cool, I run win xp sp2 anyway... but will this allow other computers on the same network to patch through it, and get to the router on the other side or not

and which side am I bridging non-internet side or Internet side?

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ok, cool, I run win xp sp2 anyway... but will this allow other computers on the same network to patch through it, and get to the router on the other side or not

and which side am I bridging non-internet side or Internet side?

You would only want to bridge pc to pc, as it would expose your pc to the internet if you brought in both externtal and internal connections.

Read through the page and there are a few other links on that page which go over the security issue sinvolved with it. It basically ties one pc to two other pc's as if it were the router(I assume) aso you could make on of the bridged conenctions your router, but I think they said not to do that as it will expose them to the internet(if I am readign it right)

Anyone else use Bridged connections in XP, maybe shed some light on this subject. I still have questions about it myself, as I never got it to work correctly. One thing you will have to do is turn off the Windows Firewall/internet Connection sharing service(ICS), so this is what may put your pc at risk, but if you add something like Zone Alarm on top of it, it should work and still keep you somewhat protected.

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This is all from memory so it might not be 100% accurate.

There are two things that XP(even home version) can do to allow you to connect 2 networks together.

The easy way is to use a network bridge. That can be set up in "Network Connections." This is joining the networks on level 2. This is such a low level that all traffic can pass through and all computers on those networks will see each other as if they are now on the same network. You can still use Windows Firewall with the network bridge, you simply handle all the effected network connections as if they were one connection. When it comes to bridging directly to the internet, the only reason to do so would be to set up a DMZ, and you most likely have no reason to do so. This method is very easy to set up and should work best with a smaller network with few security considerations.

The alternative is to make your XP box into a router. This is called level 3. This is a much harder process. This has to be done trough the NETSH prompt. NETSH gives you a few ways to do this including setting up routing tables, network address translation, and tunneling. This is much more difficult, but is suitable for larger networks and will help prevent any attacks launched across the route. This can also allow a computer that is directly connected to the internet to provide protected access to other computers on the local network in a way similar to ICS.

In both cases you CAN and SHOULD still use Windows Firewall to protect the local machine.

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This is all from memory so it might not be 100% accurate.

There are two things that XP(even home version) can do to allow you to connect 2 networks together.

The easy way is to use a network bridge. That can be set up in "Network Connections." This is joining the networks on level 2. This is such a low level that all traffic can pass through and all computers on those networks will see each other as if they are now on the same network. You can still use Windows Firewall with the network bridge, you simply handle all the effected network connections as if they were one connection. When it comes to bridging directly to the internet, the only reason to do so would be to set up a DMZ, and you most likely have no reason to do so. This method is very easy to set up and should work best with a smaller network with few security considerations.

The alternative is to make your XP box into a router. This is called level 3. This is a much harder process. This has to be done trough the NETSH prompt. NETSH gives you a few ways to do this including setting up routing tables, network address translation, and tunneling. This is much more difficult, but is suitable for larger networks and will help prevent any attacks launched across the route. This can also allow a computer that is directly connected to the internet to provide protected access to other computers on the local network in a way similar to ICS.

In both cases you CAN and SHOULD still use Windows Firewall to protect the local machine.

One of the requirements for Bridging in the example Microsoft gives on their website is you have to turn off the ICS service(Windows Firewall/Internet Connection Sharing) in order to get two nic cards in one pc to "bridge" a connection together with two other pc's. If all you wanted to do was make a pc a router, you could add a few cards(or get one with multiple ports on it) and smooth wall the connections going in and out, etc.

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