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Computer Desktop Assembly Tips for DualBoot Linux and Windows 11


Linux8200

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Hmm, that's a bit tough, since you're not really giving a lot of info, or say anything about a budget.
But, VM's first : How many are you planning to run at the same time ? How much load do you think you'll be running on each VM ?

A normal quad desktop with 16 GB RAM should be enough for a VM or two. But if you plan on running a lot of VM's and want them to run smooth, that's another story.

Here I'm running a custom build AMD Ryzen 9, 16 core, 32 threads, 64 GB RAM, dual SSD disks and a quad graphics card., running a custom Kali Linux.
This system can run about ten VM's simultaneously. I should note here, that this is a 4000 USD system, so I guess not for everyone ๐Ÿ˜‰

And for building a machine. If you've never tried to build a desktop yourself or a server, that would be the place to start. Learn that first, learn some Linux and Windows, read some hardware guides to learn what are good parts, and how to actually design a system.

If it's something you need ASAP, I would talk to your local computer shop, and ask them to build a system for VM work, a system that can run under heavy loads. Some times gamer rigs can be a possibility if nothing else is available.

And, since you mention penetration testing, I guess that's what you want a VM system anyway, that would be the smart choice, keeping it inย  a VM.
But programming doesn't require much, anything from a dualcore cpu with 2 GB RAM is usually enough.

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Honestly, I'd say go away and first of all just learn how to build a machine and install an operating system before you dive in all the rest, as you need that core knowledge first.

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On 4/12/2022 at 7:43 AM, NoExecute said:

Hmm, that's a bit tough, since you're not really giving a lot of info, or say anything about a budget.
But, VM's first : How many are you planning to run at the same time ? How much load do you think you'll be running on each VM ?

A normal quad desktop with 16 GB RAM should be enough for a VM or two. But if you plan on running a lot of VM's and want them to run smooth, that's another story.

Here I'm running a custom build AMD Ryzen 9, 16 core, 32 threads, 64 GB RAM, dual SSD disks and a quad graphics card., running a custom Kali Linux.
This system can run about ten VM's simultaneously. I should note here, that this is a 4000 USD system, so I guess not for everyone ๐Ÿ˜‰

And for building a machine. If you've never tried to build a desktop yourself or a server, that would be the place to start. Learn that first, learn some Linux and Windows, read some hardware guides to learn what are good parts, and how to actually design a system.

If it's something you need ASAP, I would talk to your local computer shop, and ask them to build a system for VM work, a system that can run under heavy loads. Some times gamer rigs can be a possibility if nothing else is available.

And, since you mention penetration testing, I guess that's what you want a VM system anyway, that would be the smart choice, keeping it inย  a VM.
But programming doesn't require much, anything from a dualcore cpu with 2 GB RAM is usually enough.

Hi,

I am thankful with your guidance, I worked with old and new computers and I can assemble a computer But it is difficult to synchronize hardware components with the Linux operating system and compatibility of Linux with Windows as a dual boot. For example, I installed various Linux distributions thousands of times on an Asus tuf gaming laptop and tried to fix frequent errors with the BIOS and Nvidia graphics driver.And finally I managed to install one of the Debian distributions for my laptop and fixed its errors as much as possible.

And now I need a desktop computer on which to install Linux and Windows as dual boot without error, Launch virtualization in Linux for malware analysis labs as well as programming, I need 2 to 3 machines for virtualization, malware programming and analysis, and penetration testing

Which should I choose between AMD and Intel?

And which brand and model of motherboard and graphics card are fully compatible with Linux?

ย 

On 4/12/2022 at 9:55 AM, Rkiver said:

Honestly, I'd say go away and first of all just learn how to build a machine and install an operating system before you dive in all the rest, as you need that core knowledge first.

Hi,

In the last two months, I have installed and removed thousands of different Linux distributions on an Asus gaming laptop, To be able to fix these errors and to some extent I succeeded.

https://i.imgur.com/sfvjew0.png

KvF6JRN.png

Qne4vCI.png

ย 

ย 

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Okay ๐Ÿ˜‰

Sorry if I come across as an ass here, but let me explain..

It sounds like you're in the stage of "Let me throw a Linux at something, and see if it sticks, if not, let me find another distro".
There's nothing wrong with that, it helps you find "your" distro, the one that's right for you.
BUT, it's also tough to get anything running that way, because you never learn "why" it worked or not.
Pick a distribution, get it to run without errors, learn how to compile source code, and fix errors first, on ONE machine.

Dual-Boot, just...dont. It's a pain to get running stable, so pick your distribution, install it as your main OS, and run VBox from there.
A good idea is to keep a separate Windows / MacOS / whatever, as a backup workstation / target.

Most modern hardware is not really a problem on something like Debian / Kali, but it depends. Try a Kali in "Live Mode", to get a feel for how the hardware performs, what works and what doesn't work. Some things won't work, but can be made to work, and some never will..
Also learn to find out what hardware it runs, what kernel modules is needed and so on. Yes, it can be a bitch, but it's the only way forward.
I would suggest you also look into building a custom Kali Live iso for debugging / testing custom modules / software, it's quite a nice feature.

My suggestion would be a Debian Testing, since it's more updated than a normal Debian. And remember that Ubuntu, Kali, Mint-Debian is Debian based, so if you dive into the terminal and learn that, they basically are all the same. But, if you know that you want to do pentesting,I would really suggest a Kali workstation, or something like parrot Linux.

Go get the Kali Linux handbook from the Kali website, and get Debian Administrators Handbook, then you should be well on your way ๐Ÿ™‚

As for VM's, I would go for a machine with NVME drives and 4 cores+, 32GB RAM.

Edited by NoExecute
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  • 2 weeks later...

What is your budget for a new PC? If you don't need a powerful video card, you can fit in $ 500. I also advise you to pay special attention to the choice of hard drive and SSD, they must be new and with a guarantee. So that you do not have situations when Windows detects problems with the hard drive. This is not the case when you need to save. Instead, you can buy a used processor and RAM. And the motherboard and power supply must be new. You can also save on the PC case and even find free options.

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