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percy3739

Types of Hackers?

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Abbas Naderi quoted on quora.com:

"Depends on the type of hacker. Script kiddies and tool junkies use tool-packed linux distributions, such as Kali, Backtrack and etc.

Real hackers (those that create the tools for junkies) use a combination of operating systems, each one has its own advantages and disadvantages.

Linux, provides us with many tools and is highly flexible in probing, creating and manipulating systems and information. However, it has a terrible UI and its lack of reliable, enterprise applications make it hard for day to day use (yes, hackers play video games and watch movies too).

Windows, which is the required but hated target for most hackers, enables us to work with Windows-only environments, such as .NET framework, Windows-based malware and etc.

Many hacking attempts require infecting or hacking a Windows machine, and without having one (or more) to develop and test on, no hacker can get past this blockade.

Mac OS X, my favorite, is a combination of both worlds. It comes with a wide range of very rich, carefully designed enterprise applications that enable day to day use of the computer, is a very reliable and stable operating system (I haven’t reinstalled or flashed my Mac OS X machines in 10 years, and I have several under constant use), and is POSIX compatible (read supports Linux programs).

Also Mac OS X is not a popular target for malware and hacking attempts, because it is neither the most famous server (Linux) nor the most famous client (Windows), giving hackers that use it a [false] sense of security. (you know how doctors are more afraid of diseases than anyone else, because they know!).

I, and most of my hacker friends (given the chance) use a OS X machine as our main, day to day machine, have several different Windows machines, with at least one running on bare metal (not virtualized) to be able to use hardware and GPU directly, and have several Linux virtual machines here and there, for testing, development, analysis and etc."

Is that true,then how can install hacking tools in other linux distributions?

9.5k Views · View Upvoters · Answer requested by ZiShan Khan

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Download the sourcecode; compile and test ?

 

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"Depends on the type of hacker. Script kiddies and tool junkies use tool-packed linux distributions, such as Kali, Backtrack and etc. Real hackers (those that create the tools for junkies) use a combination of operating systems, each one has its own advantages and disadvantages."

This isn't necessarily true, imo. The truth is somewhere in the middle of this.

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Linux, provides us with many tools and is highly flexible in probing, creating and manipulating systems and information. However, it has a terrible UI and its lack of reliable, enterprise applications make it hard for day to day use (yes, hackers play video games and watch movies too).

Saying "Linux has a terrible UI" is entirely subjective, and is kind of a moot point considering there are a lot of different environments available on Linux, that can be highly customized. As for the "lack of enterprise applications" part, Valve have done a lot of work with Steam and other vendors to bring games to Linux, and watching movies on Linux has been possible for longer than I've been alive...

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Windows, which is the required but hated target for most hackers, enables us to work with Windows-only environments, such as .NET framework, Windows-based malware and etc. Many hacking attempts require infecting or hacking a Windows machine, and without having one (or more) to develop and test on, no hacker can get past this blockade.

What?

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Mac OS X, my favorite, is a combination of both worlds. It comes with a wide range of very rich, carefully designed enterprise applications that enable day to day use of the computer, is a very reliable and stable operating system (I haven’t reinstalled or flashed my Mac OS X machines in 10 years, and I have several under constant use), and is POSIX compatible (read supports Linux programs).

Also Mac OS X is not a popular target for malware and hacking attempts, because it is neither the most famous server (Linux) nor the most famous client (Windows), giving hackers that use it a [false] sense of security. (you know how doctors are more afraid of diseases than anyone else, because they know!).

Mac OS X can be an incredible pain in the ass (hi @Tesla) for general hacking and development. OS X has had and currently has glaring security holes just like Windows and Linux, and I would not say it gives hackers a false sense of security in any way shape or form (It really should not.).

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I, and most of my hacker friends (given the chance) use a OS X machine as our main, day to day machine, have several different Windows machines, with at least one running on bare metal (not virtualized) to be able to use hardware and GPU directly, and have several Linux virtual machines here and there, for testing, development, analysis and etc."

In my experience (and honestly, to my surprise) lots of people in the security scene are fond of using OS X because it seems "half way between Linux and Windows", but there are also lots of people in the same scene that prefer to use Windows, or prefer to use Linux. Use whatever tool is most effective for a certain task. You wouldn't use a screwdriver to put a nail in a wall, would you?

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Is that true,then how can install hacking tools in other linux distributions?

apt-get, pacman, emerge, git clone, whatever package manager or source is available to you :P.

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I used to be a much larger proponent of macOS before I got the time to start really going through some binaries with a disassembler. I don't want to be irresponsible about disclosure but it REALLY doesn't take that long to start seeing some big problems.

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I've never called myself a hacker. I don't reckon i know enough.

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Posted (edited)

Hacking in general is a very broad based term.

You will usually find that most have a favored 'specialist' area in which they develop an expertise in, as Its quite difficult to be a kung-fu master level 11 in all.

For example, some prefer exploiting Web Applications on the server side, others on the client side......some specialize in Browser based attacks, whilst others are guru's in AP and Network exploitation etc etc.

Some hone in on Remote Code Execution exploits, others on Cross-Site Scripting exploits, others on SQL/SOAP and other Injection techniques.....anyway, you get the drift.

Depends on the type of hacker. Script kiddies and tool junkies use tool-packed linux distributions, such as Kali, Backtrack and etc.

Real hackers (those that create the tools for junkies) use a combination of operating systems, each one has its own advantages and disadvantages.

One thing is perhaps for sure, a lot of them think they are Gods Gift.

 

 

Edited by r3plic4tor
error
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MacOSX is the "OS for hackers"?

Nah, it's the OS for people who want no control over the hardware that they have no control over.

Also not a hacker, at all. I'm a techie. I just work with computers. I would never assume to call myself a hacker, I don't have ANYWHERE near the knowledge.

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Hacker - Someone who likes full control over everything techie they (or others) own.

MacOS - An operating system that is the complete opposite of control, striving to lock down every little thing that a user should be able to do, but now can't.

 

No thanks, I'll stick with Linux.

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It's also my opinion that you don't need to be very knowledgeable on <topic> to be a hacker. It's a mindset, or a way of thinking, a personality.

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Posted (edited)
13 hours ago, Foxtrot said:

It's also my opinion that you don't need to be very knowledgeable on <topic> to be a hacker. It's a mindset, or a way of thinking, a personality.

I would agree its a mindset.......most security researchers in my domain are very curious people. They are always wanting to know what makes things 'Tick'. How and Why does infrastructure work in the way it does? Can I alter a course of design to fashion its operation to my advantage? Can I protect it from other outside influences. Where are the weak points and how can I find them? etc 

What has changed since yesterday, and how can I keep abreast of ever increasing developments & shifts in the pattern of sand?

One thing that amazes me today within the security industry is with the huge rise of Mobile Devices, their implementations and therefore impact on existing infrastructure........ This is a hot topic today because of the simple fact that virtually NO consideration is given towards the security of these devices. We protect our PC's, laptops and the networks they connect to with multiple layers of security yet, most users don't even run a simple antivirus on their smartphones or tablets.

Many hackers now are switching to expose vulnerabilities in Android/iOS, especially as a means to further 'privilege escalation' among the networks these devices connect to (ie BYOD policy in the corporate world etc).

Why? ......Because they are easy targets today!

In todays online world we crave more functionality, we demand that our data is served in highly dynamic fashion compared to yesterday. We want an application for everything. This is great news for us as users, but with this comes the price of exponentially increasing the size of our attack surface and its many weaknesses just waiting to be exposed.

Edited by r3plic4tor

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On 6/1/2018 at 5:49 AM, haze1434 said:

No thanks, I'll stick with Linux.

Cheers to that 🐧

It seems to be kind of an unspoken rule that almost all `hackers` have a certain tendency towards really wanting to understand how tech actually works from a ground-up level. Linux/*nix type OSs are paired perfectly for this kind of mindset, imho..

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If by hacker you are referring to computer hacker I have to agree that Linux is the best option. But you need a basic understanding of multiples systems to be able to accomplish whatever that is your goal

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On 6/1/2018 at 10:21 PM, Foxtrot said:

It's also my opinion that you don't need to be very knowledgeable on <topic> to be a hacker. It's a mindset, or a way of thinking, a personality.

Hacker means an object (or person) that hacks. So, while the first part of what you said is true, the second part isn't necessarily true because being a hacker means that you hack (exploit bugs and take advantage of weaknesses for the gain of yourself or something else).

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33 minutes ago, Dave-ee Jones said:

Hacker means an object (or person) that hacks. So, while the first part of what you said is true, the second part isn't necessarily true because being a hacker means that you hack (exploit bugs and take advantage of weaknesses for the gain of yourself or something else).

Uhh, what??  That's being a criminal, not being a hacker, there's a difference!

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49 minutes ago, barry99705 said:

Uhh, what??  That's being a criminal, not being a hacker, there's a difference!

How can you change the meaning of a word that's been derived from 2 words explaining exactly what it does?

Hacker comes from "hack" which means "gain unauthorized access to data in a system or computer."

The "er" in the word explaining what is doing the hacking (the person or object that's been called a "hacker").

Unfortunately, Barry, that's how words work. Gaining unauthorised access legally is quite difficult, and most often times ends in court.

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Posted (edited)

Too understand what the bad guys are doing, we need to perform the same techniques, and in turn, inform the security world of what took place!

To catch a fish, you need to think like a fish. 🐟

Its all about the hack as others have stated, but is it a hack for good, or for evil?

That depends on the mindset of the attacker!

Edited by r3plic4tor

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9 hours ago, Dave-ee Jones said:

How can you change the meaning of a word that's been derived from 2 words explaining exactly what it does?

Hacker comes from "hack" which means "gain unauthorized access to data in a system or computer."

The "er" in the word explaining what is doing the hacking (the person or object that's been called a "hacker").

Unfortunately, Barry, that's how words work. Gaining unauthorised access legally is quite difficult, and most often times ends in court.

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hacker

[hak-er]
ExamplesWord Origin
See more synonyms on Thesaurus.com noun
  1. Digital Technology.
    1. a person who has a high level of skill in computer technology or programming; a computer expert or enthusiast:My brother is a real hacker—he fixed my laptop in no time.
    2. a person who circumvents security and breaks into a network, computer, file, etc., usually with malicious intent:A hacker got into my computer remotely and wiped my hard drive!The company has hired hackers to test system security.

#2 is just the Fox News definition(kind of like every gun is an AR-15).  We old school guys call them criminals, not hackers.  

 

That's not the definition of hack either...

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To hack was to use an item for something than it's original intended purpose.

Darren once gave a great example as I recall, standing on a chair to change a lightbulb is in it's very essence, a hack.

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Posted (edited)
1 hour ago, Rkiver said:

To hack was to use an item for something than it's original intended purpose.

Thats right its been hijacked over the years - didnt it originate from putting in electric motors into unpowered model trains? sure I recall something along those lines

EDIT -

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The first bona fide appearance of a computer hacker occurs nearly 100 years later, in the 1960s. A “hack” has always been a kind of shortcut or modification—a way to bypass or rework the standard operation of an object or system. The term originated with model train enthusiasts at MIT who hacked their train sets in order to modify how they worked. Several of these same model train hackers later applied their curiosity and resourcefulness to the then new computer systems being deployed on the campus

http://steel.lcc.gatech.edu/~mcordell/lcc6316/Hacker Group Project FINAL.pdf

Edited by Just_a_User

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@Just_a_User I was waiting for someone to bring up the old MIT definition which is the definition I follow.  It is also the definition Hackerspaces follow.  Term has gone through all kinds of changes when it originally meant something like jury rigging or taking parts meant for one thing and re-purposing them for something they were not intended for originally.

 

 

With that meaning you can use it like Information Security Hacker.  This could mean someone who can take parts of Information Security and make it do things it was not intended to do....like allow unauthorized access.

Later the term began being used to just mean Security Hacker.  Later in an attempt to reclaim the term people began to use it as meaning an expert of something.

Regardless, I go by the original MIT term since I do do security, my real hobby is building stuff at my local hackerspace....like my new cantenna I made from a stainless steel toilet brush holder.  😛  Looks professional even with a tripod hehe.

Oh, not a fan of Macs.  I never have been, especially for hacking.  It is restrictive and gets more restrictive with each update.   Even clobbering Linux onto them is not a walk in the park at all and too much effort (and money) to even get it for that.  With Computer InfoSec you want something that is flexible.  Macs are not flexible.  Neither is Windows.  You can use what you want, I am sticking with Linux on a compat thank you.

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