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Free internet


Yakamashii
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Uh..ok, I want free interwebs..sign me up! Splain me how this works?? Where do I plug in my stuff?

 

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Edited by digip
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18 hours ago, Yakamashii said:

Hey guys, i have n idea.

what is you took a cat 7e eth cable, and in the middle somewher you cut it open and "siphon" the data out (not like the turtle) and send it to a wifi pineapple and host a private network.

you could get free internet, and no one would know.

Seems very long-winded just to get free internet. Have you not heard of Aircrack?

Also, as barry advises, this is illegal.

Or, just use a free WiFi hotspot? It's 2017, not 1997. 'Free' internet is everywhere.

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2 hours ago, barry99705 said:

Has anyone here actually seen/used CAT7?  I've done a class on terminating the stuff, but have never encountered it in the wild.  Any time we need anything faster than 10gig, we use fiber.

I don't have anything really wired other than from my desktop to the router which is on cat6a for years now, while the router is bridged wirelessly to my main router which then goes to the modem. I'd like to run directly from room to room with wired, but I just haven't bought the cable to make use of it for the new house. When/If I do, I will probably go with the Cat7a, but ideally, I need to get rid of the third router, which is an older cisco and can't do the 802.11 AC that my other two are using now. I don't even know if my other two have 10-Gigabit physical ports. I think they are only Gigabit, but better to have the 7a cable even if you don't have 10-GBit network equipment, because when you do upgrade, you'll then have that cable, vs having to upgrade both later on. It will work fine and backwards compatible, if anything should reduce network noise even more and maximize the hardware and adapter speeds you already have, even if they are only 10/100/1000 devices. I don't see any reason to buy older standards other than maybe for small patch cable to carry in a laptop case for when on the road.

23 hours ago, Yakamashii said:

Hey guys, i have n idea.

what is you took a cat 7e eth cable, and in the middle somewher you cut it open and "siphon" the data out (not like the turtle) and send it to a wifi pineapple and host a private network.

 

 

you could get free internet, and no one would know.

What is cat-7e? Cat-7 and Cat-7a. 

I know we're trolling you a bit, but I think maybe you think this is some simple task, which also would be breaking the law if you get caught tapping into a physical connection other than your own. How do you plan to "siphon" data, in order to make an internet connection, and from where? How are you connecting to this other said network backbone to the internet, where are these physical wires you plan to jack into? I think there is some fundamental stuff missing here on your part and the scenario.  Mostly networking 101 in general seems to have just went out the window here, not sure I understand how you managed to get free inernet with a "private" network, shared with the pineapple, and then to whom? Fake AP, that hosts private network connected to itself? 

 

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When we redid an entire schools network we did used cat6 and fiber.

Cat6 for anything within 60 meters, and then fiber to two cabs at over 90 meters away, and they acting as remote hubs for anything close to them. Worked very well and only took two weeks to redo it in it's entirety. 

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10 hours ago, Rkiver said:

When we redid an entire schools network we did used cat6 and fiber.

Cat6 for anything within 60 meters, and then fiber to two cabs at over 90 meters away, and they acting as remote hubs for anything close to them. Worked very well and only took two weeks to redo it in it's entirety. 

Sounds like a lot of money though :unsure:

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It was a complete and badly needed rebuild. Total cost, for one big comms rack, two smaller racks, upgrading to full gigabit networking, poe switches, new server, new wifi access points, the lot, came to almost 30,000 Euro.

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10 hours ago, Rkiver said:

It was a complete and badly needed rebuild. Total cost, for one big comms rack, two smaller racks, upgrading to full gigabit networking, poe switches, new server, new wifi access points, the lot, came to almost 30,000 Euro.

That's not too horrible.  We usually bill out at about $150 per network drop.  I usually stay out of the billing side though, just give my boss my opinion of what needs to be installed and where, then he builds out the quote.

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Well, and here we are going off topic entirely but who cares at this point, I run a small IT company that specialises in schools, but also works in Youth Centres where those who cannot hack education, very much not academic kids, but want to learn SOMETHING, and build them computer rooms with cast of tech from larger companies. The reason why is most IT companies that work with schools in Ireland charge idiotically high amounts. 5000 Euro retainer, 100 euro per hour or part therof, and that's before you get a single piece of equipment.

Education is one of the most important things that can be done. Provide education and healthcare, and you have a healthy, intelligent workforce.

So I set out to see if I could do it, cheaper, and give a more personal touch. I will subcontract to individual companies that I know don't charge the earth (like the company that did the entire network build for our largest stadiums). They have all the equipment already bought usually, and schools don't need idiotically high end, as such they are willing to do good deals, especially if I then would tag them for the next school.

A good example is we had a company quote almost 20,000 Euro for just wifi. As in new access points, no new wiring, and poe switches. That was for 12 Unifi AP-PRO and two POE switches. I am sure anyone with a bit of google-fu will tell you it is no where near that costly, even with paying for time per hour.

I dislike those who rip off schools.  A lot. 

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On 9/30/2017 at 7:10 PM, Rkiver said:

A good example is we had a company quote almost 20,000 Euro for just wifi. As in new access points, no new wiring, and poe switches. That was for 12 Unifi AP-PRO and two POE switches. I am sure anyone with a bit of google-fu will tell you it is no where near that costly, even with paying for time per hour.

I dislike those who rip off schools.  A lot. 

20,000 Euro for a WiFi installation?? You whot?!

Oh, 12 AP-PROs..Right. Still, wouldn't imagine it to be 20,000 Euros..Maybe half that?

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Yea, just the radios would be around $1,400 us.  Unless it's a huge building, one switch could feed them, otherwise one switch per floor, still only a few poe switches, add another couple thousand.  Yea, ten grand sounds pretty close when you add in cabling and tech time.  A lot of times we get the schools to purchase the equipment, they get awesome discounts on hardware and software, then we install it.  I used to work for a school district, really miss my education discount on stuff..

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16 hours ago, Dave-ee Jones said:

Oh, 12 AP-PROs..Right. Still, wouldn't imagine it to be 20,000 Euros..Maybe half that?

Not even half. They were ripping schools off. The actual cost came to 4000 Euro.

Edited by Rkiver
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On 10/3/2017 at 3:13 AM, Rkiver said:

Not even half. They were ripping schools off. The actual cost came to 4000 Euro.

Well there's also the time it takes to install 12 APs and switches and setup the back-end which can be quite a lot of money at ~90 Euros an hour or so (depends on the techies). Still, all you really need to do with the APs is stick them in the roof and remotely program them from the cloud..(kinda like Aerohive).

That still could have easily been another grand or so of Euros. But yes, still not quite even half, haha.

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Time to install, one afternoon. Switches, a swap job from the old ones. Cabling, already in place. All the backend was already in place.

 

It was litterally just the APs, which were replacing older ones,  There was no way it was near half. That company was trying to rip them off for not knowing better.

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Yea, once all the hardware is installed it only takes 10-15 minutes to set them all up.  We usually set up the controller before any of the hardware swaps, so we can spool up an access point as the old ones are going down.  Keeps the down time for the client at a minimum.  The one thing I wish Ubiquiti did that Ruckus does is auto configure new hardware.  If you have a Ruckus controller on your network, when it sees a new access point it will auto configure it.  That would be really handy if you're doing a job by yourself.

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9 hours ago, barry99705 said:

If you have a Ruckus controller on your network, when it sees a new access point it will auto configure it.  That would be really handy if you're doing a job by yourself.

Ubiquiti and Aerohive do that, but it's based on MAC and serial number, which I guess helps a lot if you just want to put another AP on the network that does something differently. You can auto-provision the APs with the ports configured from the cloud (WAN, LAN etc.). Pretty neat as it means you can configure everything in-office then just install the APs, put the switch in and your done. Ez pz.

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17 hours ago, Dave-ee Jones said:

Ubiquiti and Aerohive do that, but it's based on MAC and serial number, which I guess helps a lot if you just want to put another AP on the network that does something differently. You can auto-provision the APs with the ports configured from the cloud (WAN, LAN etc.). Pretty neat as it means you can configure everything in-office then just install the APs, put the switch in and your done. Ez pz.

Is that with the cloud keys, or can the desktop controller do it too?  I've not seen that option yet.

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4 hours ago, barry99705 said:

Is that with the cloud keys, or can the desktop controller do it too?  I've not seen that option yet.

Pretty sure Unifi uses the Cloud Key controller, while Aerohive does all their work in the cloud. Basically what happens with Aerohive is you pre-configure the physical ports, SSIDs, forwarding etc. in the cloud. Aerohive then picks up any Aerohive APs connected on that network (or can even sniff out global ones via their serial numbers) and programs them according to what you set so everything works as soon as you plug it in (almost - about a minute of downloading and configuring time).

Check out HiveManager (NG is the better one).

Edited by Dave-ee Jones
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