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noob question can I use the PV as a modem and connect it to a router


odeon
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Is it possible to use a pineapple V as a modem? I have just bought a sony avr and it's firmware HAS to be updated using an ethernet cable ( don't ask me why) I have NO intention of hooking this thing to my router so is there a way I can log into a wireless AP via the Pineapple V connect it to a spare router that I have and then connect the sony to the router so it can get out to the net through the Pv. ANY help would be appreciated as I haven't any skills with the PV yet.

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Curious why you wouldn't want it connected to your router. The router will prevent the outside from contacting it unless you specifically tell it to do so.

And yes, you can have your Pineapple provide ethernet to the AVR and connect it to a wireless AP so it acts as a networking bridge from ethernet to wifi. Not sure what you expect the Pineapple to do with the traffic though. If you're just going to pipe through, you should just connect directly.

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Are you updating the firmware from the local lan? If so, you'd probably need a crossover cable directly from PC to the Sony and a tftp server. Otherwise, it's going to need internet access to update I would think. The MarkV is not a modem, but it can act as a gateway for the Sony if it has internet access and can be directed to it. It is still a router itself, even if it has extra functions than most home routers, it can be setup to work just like a normal router, although, you're probably better off just plugging it into a normal router that is connected to your modem. By itself it will not act as a modem, it has no way to connect with the incoming coax to a homes cable line or DSL hookup. It can only act as a gateway to the modem/internet connection coming into your home via its WAN port that connects to the modem.

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Curious why you wouldn't want it connected to your router. The router will prevent the outside from contacting it unless you specifically tell it to do so.

And yes, you can have your Pineapple provide ethernet to the AVR and connect it to a wireless AP so it acts as a networking bridge from ethernet to wifi. Not sure what you expect the Pineapple to do with the traffic though. If you're just going to pipe through, you should just connect directly.

I am getting increasingly paranoid about hooking devices to my home network so if I can NOT do that then I will do so, belt and braces approach. So I am not sure how to hook up the Pineapple V to do this. My setup is that I can log into an xfinity hotspot across the road and I assume I can get the PV to do that bit so it can see the net BUT I don't really get how to hook up the Sony DN1050? It has a RJ45 which I assume I hook into the PV and then turn on the Sony which "should" see the web. Is that what you are saying please? and thanks for taking an interest in a noob

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Are you updating the firmware from the local lan? If so, you'd probably need a crossover cable directly from PC to the Sony and a tftp server. Otherwise, it's going to need internet access to update I would think. The MarkV is not a modem, but it can act as a gateway for the Sony if it has internet access and can be directed to it. It is still a router itself, even if it has extra functions than most home routers, it can be setup to work just like a normal router, although, you're probably better off just plugging it into a normal router that is connected to your modem. By itself it will not act as a modem, it has no way to connect with the incoming coax to a homes cable line or DSL hookup. It can only act as a gateway to the modem/internet connection coming into your home via its WAN port that connects to the modem.

I don't want to hook this thing to my lan as paranoia has set in :-) SO I want to connect my PV to a xfinity hotspot across the road and just plug in the dn1050 ( it's got an rj45 for a hard cable which is how they update the firmware. My thoughts are I can change the PV mac address just in case Sony are playing silly buggers. The issue is I don't know the steps to connect my PV to the xfinity and plug in the dn1050 to the etherport on the PV HOPING it will see the net and update. Thanks for taking an interest in someone who clearly has lost the plot ....

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I am getting increasingly paranoid about hooking devices to my home network so if I can NOT do that then I will do so, belt and braces approach.

The first step to recovery is to admit you have a problem. :smile:

Since it's *your* network, why are you distrusting it and what can be done to remedy this? Because the alternative is to outright remove it since, after all, if you don't trust it you really shouldn't use it, and if you're not going to use it why is it even there? That's not paranoia, that's common sense. It's why I un-jailbroke (is that a word?) my iPhone last year.

So talk to me. Where did the distrust come from and what would suffice to fix that?

My setup is that I can log into an xfinity hotspot across the road and I assume I can get the PV to do that bit

Ah, so you distrust the home network to the point where you're expecting a network elsewhere, outside of your realm of control, is safer to use. I'd be interested to learn what caused this, but the bottom line is that you should be focussing on ripping out the LAN and rebuilding it in a way that you trust it again. Also, do you want to protect the AVR from something on the LAN, protect the LAN from something on the AVR, or both?

So I am not sure how to hook up the Pineapple V to do this. so it can see the net BUT I don't really get how to hook up the Sony DN1050? It has a RJ45 which I assume I hook into the PV and then turn on the Sony which "should" see the web. Is that what you are saying please? and thanks for taking an interest in a noob

Indeed, that's exactly what I'm saying. You can verify this beforehand with any device that has ethernet, so any PC or laptop with an ethernet plug can do this. By default the Pineapple already has a DHCP running on the ethernet side of it so it should be a matter of plug and play.

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I think it's not that he doesn't trust his network, it's that he doesn't trust his TV manufacturer enough to put their TV on his network.

On my network I have to unblock Taiwan whenever I update my TV or blue-ray players. Once that's done, the blocks go back up.

SPOT ON!!! read the EULA for your "smart" tv OR avr and be VERY afraid!!

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The first step to recovery is to admit you have a problem. :smile:

Since it's *your* network, why are you distrusting it and what can be done to remedy this? Because the alternative is to outright remove it since, after all, if you don't trust it you really shouldn't use it, and if you're not going to use it why is it even there? That's not paranoia, that's common sense. It's why I un-jailbroke (is that a word?) my iPhone last year.

So talk to me. Where did the distrust come from and what would suffice to fix that?

Ah, so you distrust the home network to the point where you're expecting a network elsewhere, outside of your realm of control, is safer to use. I'd be interested to learn what caused this, but the bottom line is that you should be focussing on ripping out the LAN and rebuilding it in a way that you trust it again. Also, do you want to protect the AVR from something on the LAN, protect the LAN from something on the AVR, or both?

Indeed, that's exactly what I'm saying. You can verify this beforehand with any device that has ethernet, so any PC or laptop with an ethernet plug can do this. By default the Pineapple already has a DHCP running on the ethernet side of it so it should be a matter of plug and play.

the distrust comes from reading the EULA that comes with any "smart" device these days. Thanks for the help I feel a little more confident now, excellent help.

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all done OUTSTANDING help Cooper, you are a good man in a storm. When you use these "smart" devices why not turn on packet sniffing to see what they are up to. Remember they are capable of wandering around your environment and who knows what they will send back to the mother ship.

thanks

odeon

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If you want to see what it's going to do, get a cross over cable and plug your PC directly into it while running a packet sniffer. Anything the TV sends, will be picked up by your NIC and the packet capturing software, for example, wireshark, tcpdump or the like. From there, if it's trying to get DCHP, you may need to have a DHCP server on the machine and DNS running(can use a VM with these services as well and feed it to the closed network of the TV and yourself. From there, give it an IP on the closed network and monitor it's DNS requests and IP/Domain names it tries to access if any. it's not going to show you everything since some of where it tries to connect may be encrypted end points it expects to get SSL/TLS replies from for updating (although most devices these days seem to lack any kind of security or use hard coded certificates and keys which if broken, compromised all similar devices. Just ask Dell). At a minimum, you'll see what it tries to request.

To see what it sends and receives you may have to do the comcast xfinity hop if you are afraid the TV is going to scan your home LAN. TV's often use things like SSDP, uPnP, and DLNA for accessing the network and streaming, or even receiving streams form things like mobile phones, all of which can be blocked at the router/firewall level. Won't block non standard encrypted port use, but using a packet sniffer, you'll be able to see which ports those are and can block accordingly if you're uncomfortable with it. UPNP standqrd port is 1900, but devices can use any port they want really. SSDP also uses 1900, but can also use 5000.

You can see here as example, depending on the type of device, ports can also vary per manufacturer - https://support.plex.tv/hc/en-us/articles/201543147-What-network-ports-do-I-need-to-allow-through-my-firewall-

Smart tv's that also use things like Netflix, Hulu, YouTUBE, are also going to have specific end points they contact for TV App updates, not just the TV's software, so take this into consideration, if you want to use Netflix and the TV was old and not online for a long time, it may not work until it can update the Netflix software. Had that issue with one of our Blue-ray players. If streaming to video from the internet on your TV is a concern, get a laptop with HDMI and plug it in that way. We used to do this with our Acer Aspire one to watch Hulu on the TV without a subscription, using the free version from the website via the laptop's browser.

Good luck, post back what you find. I doubt Sony is spying on your home network, but curious to see what you find.

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