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Combine two dsl line?


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Its called load balancing/bonding/multilink, never really used it apart from a series of experiments with linking stolen wifi to my own connection, you just need a router with dual wan ports.

http://tetro.net/misc/multilink.html

http://www.upstreaminter.net/bondedcd.shtml

http://www.google.co.uk/search?hl=en&q=multilink+adsl

any use?

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Its called load balancing/bonding/multilink, never really used it apart from a series of experiments with linking stolen wifi to my own connection, you just need a router with dual wan ports.

http://tetro.net/misc/multilink.html

http://www.upstreaminter.net/bondedcd.shtml

http://www.google.co.uk/search?hl=en&q=multilink+adsl

any use?

alright mate.. that works.. i got it!

one question though... well let's say one ADSL line has a public IP address set and the other one I get would be like having a dynamic IP.. would both be bound having my fixed IP address?

thx

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Beyond the scope of my expirence, sorry mate. The example i was using had one static local IP, linked via my wifi as a client, and the other was my cable modem. I had a lot of help from the people over at dd-wrt.

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You can only bond multiple lines from the same provider; this is the only way to share a single global IP between the individual links to achieve the true aggregate bandwidth.

What you're probably trying to do is load balance, wherein you want to distribute traffic evenly (or weighted) over multiple routed links. This is possible, though more complicated to setup as the public IP address varies depending upon which link is used to transmit the packet. As a result, an entire layer four session (TCP or UDP) can only take place over one link.

For example, an HTTP download from ISP A would be limited to the maximum bandwidth of that link, but you could run a second download from ISP B to utilize the remaining bandwidth from the second link. The upshot of this is that load balancing over multiple upstream ISPs provides some level of redundancy.

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You can only bond multiple lines from the same provider; this is the only way to share a single global IP between the individual links to achieve the true aggregate bandwidth.

What you're probably trying to do is load balance, wherein you want to distribute traffic evenly (or weighted) over multiple routed links. This is possible, though more complicated to setup as the public IP address varies depending upon which link is used to transmit the packet. As a result, an entire layer four session (TCP or UDP) can only take place over one link.

For example, an HTTP download from ISP A would be limited to the maximum bandwidth of that link, but you could run a second download from ISP B to utilize the remaining bandwidth from the second link. The upshot of this is that load balancing over multiple upstream ISPs provides some level of redundancy.

no it would be using the same ISP... i though that by default every line you get would be using an IP?! maybe I am mistaking... but if it's possible for them to only assign on IP over two dsl connection.. then that's fine

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I'm not sure exacly what software would be involved (obviously some), but it seems to me that it doesn't matter hat provider the connections are from as long as they work. You would connect them (one way or another) to one computer which will now act as the default gateway for the network. That computer then decides where to send packets (have to be careful with TCP connections though, you don't want to sent the ACK through the connection you didn't send the SYN through) based on current load and number of connections established.

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I'm not sure exacly what software would be involved (obviously some), but it seems to me that it doesn't matter hat provider the connections are from as long as they work. You would connect them (one way or another) to one computer which will now act as the default gateway for the network. That computer then decides where to send packets (have to be careful with TCP connections though, you don't want to sent the ACK through the connection you didn't send the SYN through) based on current load and number of connections established.

not sure about the different ISP stuff... but anyway if you can stick with the same one..why not?

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Depends, I thought there was 2 ways of doing it. One where it used both connections as one, and you got a speed increase, and a second where it wasn't faster, but you could have more concurrent traffic at the same time. If its for speed can you not just buy a fatter pipe? Or are you limited by your local ISP's? I asked pretty much the same thing ages ago and there was a load of info in that thread. I'll see if i can dig it up for you.

edit: http://www.ezlan.net/loadbalance.html

only decent link from the thread.

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Basically to do it properly you have to have an ISP that supports Bonding, that way you have one IP and your ISP will sort out spliting the information up and sending it to you, all your router does is re-assemble it and forward it, hardly and different than a normal router.

You can do it without proper line bonding but your router needs to be more sophisticated to maximize usage. This set up appeals to me more anyway as I can have a dedicated line for servers and the other for home use, so my servers always have priority on a line.

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Depends, I thought there was 2 ways of doing it. One where it used both connections as one, and you got a speed increase, and a second where it wasn't faster, but you could have more concurrent traffic at the same time.

Yeah, that's bonding versus load balncing, respectively.

When in doubt, call your ISP and ask if they offer bonded connections (almost certain to be business class).

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