Jump to content

Archived

This topic is now archived and is closed to further replies.

Declined

Need some help

Recommended Posts

So I've ran the PeToUSB successfully on a 8gb Stick, I've formatted it to FAT32 After the error. I've installed grub4dos and moved the gldr file, created menu.lst.

Thing is that Darren starts talking alot of tech stuff after he explained how to do that. Should I mount the .iso of the program I want to use and Take a couple of folders from it and put in root directory of usb? and What folders and files???

Since people have alot of problems with their computers around here I figured I can make some extra cash by helping them out. I would like to look professional with a uber multipass when I show up ofc :).

Thanks you guys, please help me!

Edit; Im from Sweden btw

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Which Hak5 eposide was it that goes into this?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Its in the definitive config thread. Episoder number is listed by TS. The first one listed @cooper

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I don't follow. I don't know a "definitive config thread" so a link to that would've been helpful. Who is "TS" and why can't you or him simply write the number here in the post?

Is it this one?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Yeah, it looks like that was the one you were referring to.

The technical bit you couldn't follow basically boils down to "You'll have to look into it".

What happens is that there are multiple images you want to boot, all of them residing on your single USB. There are multiple ways of achieving success and like in the case of Konboot (pardon any spelling errors here) Darren will write an entry in the menu.lst file such that it will directly boot the disk image file itself. This may very well work with ISO files aswell, but from what I've seen of that episode so far he prefers to copy the data over from the ISO to the disk, so you need some way to attach a drive letter on your machine to the ISO file you just downloaded. Google for "windows mount iso" for software and tutorials that will help you do that (Darren suggests 7zip but there may be better tools now).

I'll leave it at this now and say it's your turn again: What is it you're trying to boot?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

@cooper TS would be threadstarter. I'm going back to school in october.

Will be studying and practicing to become a network technician. So im trying to get involved in anything and everything that Can get me More knowledge about networks and diagnostics and forensics. Im on a train atm so I'll be googling that in a minute or two. Thanks for time taken much appreciated

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Googling that made things easier. So i run Windows 8.1 and should be able to Mount dismount as i like with a right click.

Is it the boot folder and the .iso that goes on the stick?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

No, everything should go to the stick, but you can't arbitrarily rename folders without punishment, which is why darren can rename the boot folder (bootloader needs to know it, but that's just the menu.lst file) but not the rest (as the 'boot' folder will contain a reference to it and you don't know where this reference is).

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

by arbitrarily you mean randomly by other words? I'll have to know how to rename the folders, is it in the episode with darren?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Create a folder somewhere on the usb stick. Right-click it and select 'rename'. Give it an alternate name of your own choice (=arbitrarily) and voila: you renamed a folder.

You can change everything when it's on the stick (nothing prevents you from doing so), but you should not change anything other that the boot folder of an iso.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

by arbitrarily you mean randomly by other words?

Yes. Name it anything that makes sense to you.

I'll have to know how to rename the folders, is it in the episode with darren?

The point is that most booting things will name their folder with boot code /boot or only minor variations thereof, which is troublesome when you have multiple booting things starting from the same folder. So, rename the boot folder where applicable and copy the rest as-is and you should be good to go.

What isn't in the ep but should work to is to create multiple partitions on the stick. After all, it's just a harddisk as far as the OS is concerned.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Just saw this post by SteveSI which seems to be a tool for just the sort thing you're trying to accomplish...

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

So I've ran the PeToUSB successfully on a 8gb Stick, I've formatted it to FAT32 After the error. I've installed grub4dos and moved the gldr file, created menu.lst.

Thing is that Darren starts talking alot of tech stuff after he explained how to do that. Should I mount the .iso of the program I want to use and Take a couple of folders from it and put in root directory of usb? and What folders and files???

Since people have alot of problems with their computers around here I figured I can make some extra cash by helping them out. I would like to look professional with a uber multipass when I show up ofc :).

Thanks you guys, please help me!

Edit; Im from Sweden btw

i can make a post about how i made my multipass with lots of awesome tools like

windows 7 install

windows 8.1 install

windows 7 recovery disk 32/64 bit

hiren's boot cd 15.2

katana 3.0

kon-boot

and more

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

@cooper
I saw the easy2boot thread. gonna try it out now.

Have you heard of KKD multitool?

Also I'm wondering if this only runs live versions of OS's?

And will I be able to run lets say a harddrive rescue tool on a crashed harddrive, and then install a full OS with the help of this tool?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Have you heard of KKD multitool?

I've never heard of it and I can't find anything substantial about it. The only thing I can find are youtube videos in a language I can't comprehend.

Also I'm wondering if this only runs live versions of OS's?

It's almost guaranteed to. When you build an OS you need to make assumptions about where things are and in case of vital things you need to *KNOW* they're where they're supposed to be. That's next to impossible to do on anything but a live OS.

And will I be able to run lets say a harddrive rescue tool on a crashed harddrive, and then install a full OS with the help of this tool?

You should definitely be able to run some rescue tool against a crashed harddrive, but be cautious. Certain failures can result in increased damage as you use the device longer. Then again, it might be your only chance of getting your data out. Tough call.

Most but certainly not all live OSes have an option whereby you can install this live OS onto a harddisk. If you want to do this against your crashed harddrive, don't. Unless you're using the wrong word to describe what you're experiencing - a crashed harddrive has been physically damaged. You do NOT want to put anything on there that's worth anything to you. It's only going to get worse.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I've never heard of it and I can't find anything substantial about it. The only thing I can find are youtube videos in a language I can't comprehend.

It's almost guaranteed to. When you build an OS you need to make assumptions about where things are and in case of vital things you need to *KNOW* they're where they're supposed to be. That's next to impossible to do on anything but a live OS.

You should definitely be able to run some rescue tool against a crashed harddrive, but be cautious. Certain failures can result in increased damage as you use the device longer. Then again, it might be your only chance of getting your data out. Tough call.

Most but certainly not all live OSes have an option whereby you can install this live OS onto a harddisk. If you want to do this against your crashed harddrive, don't. Unless you're using the wrong word to describe what you're experiencing - a crashed harddrive has been physically damaged. You do NOT want to put anything on there that's worth anything to you. It's only going to get worse.

@cooper

1. Okay, well I managed to D/L it and it makes a usb stick bootable with the KKD multitool. I had another computer that had an issue with something called MBR. Whatever I did and tried to do, to gain access to windows or windows auto repair was in vain. Then I found KKD and repaired the MBR with one of the tools and it booted nicely, then I sold it, profit. It's like easy2boot but more advanced(i dont know) I think.

2. Ok :p.

3. Lets say the harddrive crashed, we want to clone the files to another new harddrive that I've instructed the customer to buy, and install an OS on the new HDD.. would that be a safer and do-able option? al

I love you.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Regarding 3, I would recommend installing the new OS first and then copy the files over. OS installs have a bit of a tendency to remove files in the process when they get in the way.

After that put both drives in the same machine, boot the new OS and do what you can/must to move the important files over. Ignore the OS and software completely - just re-install them later. This particular job should be only about the data.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

:lol: Trust me, you wouldn't.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

hey @cooper, should I make an NTFS or fat32 multiusb? depends if i want to run larger programs or what?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

NTFS, being the more advanced system, has several features which FAT does not.

The largest file you can have on a FAT filesystem is 4gb. If you need to copy a file from machine A to machine B using a portable drive and that file is over 4gb in size you need to chop up the file in smaller parts or not use FAT. While I don't know the exact max filesize on an NTFS filesystem, I think it's measured in Petabytes, or simply put, larger than any actually portable storage device known to man.

FAT doesn't have access controls. A file is there or it isn't. If you can access the disk, you can access any file on that disk at your leasure. NTFS and frankly all other serious file systems do have access controls on their files. This poses a problem on portable devices - when user X stores a file on an NTFS disk and that same user wants to read it back but from a different machine, how should the filesystem be made aware that X on that last machine is the current user on the current machine? The typical solution is to simply NOT employ those restrictions on portable devices, by which I mean you should not set access permissions on those files after copying and you may have to remove them after copying as they might have been copied along with the file itself.

Lasy, FAT is ubiquitous (hope I spelled that right) and effectively free so all OSes support it. NTFS is very much closed Microsoft technology and outside of a Windows machine it's a bitch to access. On Linux I know you need to use FUSE because the kernel can't touch it. Writing support has by my knowledge always been sketchy but this may have improved by now.

The rest is mostly NTFS features that don't make a lot of sense on portable drives but an awful lot of sense on regular drives. So when you install Windows someplace, please, use NTFS.

Because of that last difference I gave I personally prefer FAT but the first difference may force you to NTFS and if you plan on having a Windows live OS on there you'll probably be forced into NTFS aswell.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

  • Recently Browsing   0 members

    No registered users viewing this page.

×
×
  • Create New...