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Peak Inside Ext4 File System During Boot


logicalconfusion
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With linux and tools like Hirens Boot disk its easy to mount and view the contents for FAT32/NTFS file systems. Is there a linux utility boot disk type utility that can be used to view files(hidden volumes)? I want to check if my disk is encrypted. I don't think I installed it with disk encryption. A password is just enough security to keep the no0bs at bay. I'm afraid that someone my pry out my harddrive mount them using an external disk utility and then clone it. any ideas? BT5 R2/Ubu 12. Hirens boot disk comes loaded with utilities for Windows....

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Correct me if I am wrong, but how can a newb figure out a 200 bit encrypted password without having the processing power... doubt someone would try to brute a 16+ length multi-character password... Off hand, Lisp(*/PartFly*-+Crispy is 184 bit... how long would it take to crack that VIA a rainbow table?

But, I think true encrypt comes with bt5... takez a peep... oh yeah.... something about a Forensics suite... heavy in Konsole, but you should have a tool in the box somewhere for that...

Edited by Pwnd2Pwnr
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yea, truecrypt is an excellent freeware application. Most Linux distros do NOT encrypt stored files. It is possible NOW to configure distros like Unbuntu 12 to implement back ground encryption services so that files get encrypted directly, w/out having to rely on third part applications such as TrueCrypt. My question is how to determine if an OS actually utilizes such technology. In other words, if a newb were to pry out a harddrive whats stopping her from viewing the content by simply mounting it using hardware thats wired to another box loaded up the neck with forensics utilities such as BT 5. I have personally viewed the contents of windows FAT32 volumes by simply loading a linux distro such as knoppix which can view on board drives. I don't expect anyone to wire together crays and crack away AES encrypted volumes using 1 billion terabyte rainbow tables. I think you misunderstood....

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Just boot a live Linux CD and (e.g. knoppix) and then boot it and try mounting your partitions. You may need to read up on logical volumes if you installed linux within logical volumes rather straight into a disk partition.

Don't forget to mount with the read only option to avoid altering the content of your partitions.

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