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Help whit Usb mod


nanozer2
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Thats stupedously uselessly cool. No idea what i'd use it for though.

The hardware part of it would be fairly simple, just somekinda switch, anything game paddish would do trick. The software is a bit more complex though.

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the problen is that i dont know how to put a switch in the usb cable and the other is that how the software detects the switch

*sigh* That's the whole point of what we're saying. Don't make it all yourself, take a usb keyboard or usb game pad and just use that.

For example, if the software requires that you press the F10 key to hide everything, then take a keyboard, attach a foot pedal of some sort (or a ping pong ball - it doesn't matter, just something easy to press) to the F10 key and cut off, hide, or otherwise remove all of the other keys. Because it's USB it can be used in conjunction with your main keyboard.

If you have a USB gamepad you'd rather use, then let us know what it is and we can try to get it to work with the software.

With some creative hardware and/or registry hacking you can make a much more elegant version, but that's up to you to be creative and experiment a bit based on your needs, means, and skills - we can't spoonfeed everything. Have fun with it!

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I've made similar tools before when I was back in college, they're not hard to make/find... Then all you'd need to do is set it to use a hotkey and plug in a hcked up USB keyboard... A USB game controller would also work as was mentioned... I did actually consider that a mouse might be more elegant since it's smaller and you only have 2 buttons to worry about (hide/show perhaps?)... the downside is that in Windows I don't think you can identify which mouse sent the button press so you'd have to find a way to make Windows distinguish which I believe is very hard...

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*sigh* That's the whole point of what we're saying. Don't make it all yourself, take a usb keyboard or usb game pad and just use that.

but i want to do it myselft if some one have a page that explain how works the usb cable and how it send the data please send it to me. i think i need a pic or something but please the idea is not use a keyboard ord game pad

thanks to all

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*sigh* That's the whole point of what we're saying. Don't make it all yourself, take a usb keyboard or usb game pad and just use that.

but i want to do it myselft if some one have a page that explain how works the usb cable and how it send the data please send it to me. i think i need a pic or something but please the idea is not use a keyboard ord game pad

thanks to all

Be sure to post how you did it if you succsed( I strongly doubt it though). Writing a driver for windows can be annoying(I never tried, but all the doc's I read about it were to long for me :wink: ).

I'd do what everyone suggested and just get an old gamepad which you bought 5 years ago because you thought it was cool but never got around to using it, take it all apart, build a small box for it with a button on top and make it "press" one button on the gamepad, use some registery hacks to remap that button to run some software or something(maybe the "Show desktop" thing in windows?) and you're done. Alot easier if you ask me.

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I have to agree with the posters above; utilizing existing hardware is defiantly the way to go.

If you want to do something "creative", you can buy a relatively cheap miniature laptop wireless mouse.

These mice are usually smaller then game controllers, and their contents tend to be project-box friendly.

Such devices work on batteries, and replacing them once in a few months can get tedious.

Keep in mind that some mice support rechargeable batteries. This feature will allow you to recharge your "foot-pedal"-like device when it's not used, thus eliminating the "problem" described above.

As far as the software part's concerned, if you're going to be using this little gadget on anything that's [>= WinXP], you're in luck – it's actually very easy to read raw input from HIDs.This is rather convenient because you will not have to bother with writing a device driver - a relatively simple Win32 application is all that's required to get this to work.

In case you're wondering how your application can distinguish between device-events: Windows allows you to enumerate such devices. This means that each recognizable HID has a unique handle which can be used as a filter when you handle the WM_INPUT notification in your message handler.

I hope that this was helpful. =)

P.S.

Please excuse any grammatical errors,

English isn't my first language.

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