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Truecrypt , Hidden Os And More


kuroigetsushinde
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so anybody here use tc? and got any external hdds he uses it on ? or ssd os drive?

id appreciate it :)

p.s: and how in hell do you guys memorize 3 30+ character passwords wtf? since hidden os uses 3 passwords , my brain hurts just thinking about it exspecially after reading the tutorial over at tc site :o

and btw heard your not supposed to use internet while using the hidden os? :blink:

Edited by kuroigetsushinde
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exactly hence the need for plausible deniability aka hidden volume within a volume ;), problem is as far as ive heard that if you add or substract anything from your hidden volume it will show and thus destroy your plausible deniability :(

The CO case will hopefully be overturned on appeal. Another fact in that case was that the lady was given complete immunity. Now, that judge was still a freedom hating moron, but who knows if he would have ruled the same had she not been given immunity.

You don't need to remember 3 good pass phrases....just one, for the Hidden OS. The other two are expendable and don't have to be massive.

You can add or delete from the Hidden Volume with no worries, where did you see that? Writing to an unprotected Outer Volume can damage the Hidden, but that's it.

A variation I'm working on now is to boot only off of external media...if not, it boots into an unencrypted Windows install...why advertise at the checkpoint, if you don't have to.

PD

Edited by PaulyD
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If an adversary has access to a (dismounted) TrueCrypt volume at several points over time, he may be able to determine which sectors of the volume are changing. If you change the contents of a hidden volume (e.g., create/copy new files to the hidden volume or modify/delete/rename/move files stored on the hidden volume, etc.), the contents of sectors (ciphertext) in the hidden volume area will change. After being given the password to the outer volume, the adversary might demand an explanation why these sectors changed. Your failure to provide a plausible explanation might indicate the existence of a hidden volume within the outer volume

this from truecrypt itself , thou i asume nobody of us would give the feds access to our tc volume multiple times so i guess this isnt a worrying factor overall :rolleyes:

Edited by kuroigetsushinde
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If an adversary has access to a (dismounted) TrueCrypt volume at several points over time, he may be able to determine which sectors of the volume are changing. If you change the contents of a hidden volume (e.g., create/copy new files to the hidden volume or modify/delete/rename/move files stored on the hidden volume, etc.), the contents of sectors (ciphertext) in the hidden volume area will change. After being given the password to the outer volume, the adversary might demand an explanation why these sectors changed. Your failure to provide a plausible explanation might indicate the existence of a hidden volume within the outer volume

this from truecrypt itself , thou i asume nobody of us would give the feds access to our tc volume multiple times so i guess this isnt a worrying factor overall :rolleyes:

Yeah, physical access is a killer to almost everything. The container containing the hidden container is "out there" to grab, true...but in the case of the Hidden OS, getting that container (2nd partition) from a powered down laptop, is a little tougher. I'm thinking some sort of malware for the former...but the latter requires you to 'not know where your laptop is', multiple times. You can security tape the laptop shell, and grind out the phillips head slots and fill with JB Weld if you want...no more upgrades though :)

PD

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It depends on the laws in your country. In the USA they force you to give your password for encrypted drives (in recent cases).

Which is why I have a vpn to home. Anything I don't want anybody else to see never leaves the house. I've been pretty lucky so far crossing boarders, though for the most part it's just been US/Canada. The other countries I was in uniform, flying in my own jet. Though the last time back out of Alaska I was a civilian, and holy shit US boarder guards are grumpy! I'm just glad they didn't want to search the car. I had 5 desktops, and two fairly large file servers in the back. Plus my laptop, my dad's laptop and several pda's.

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It depends on the laws in your country. In the USA they force you to give your password for encrypted drives (in recent cases).

What else can the law really do, if the person won't give out the password, they can't sentence the person to death, the least they could do is send that person to jail for some time.

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