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How To Find A Jr. Level Positon?


Bishop
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Hi everybody,

I am hoping this is the place to post this. I have found my self in an interesting position and figured I would see what kind of insight I could get from you wonderful people.

Due to some personal circumstances I am unable to continue my university plans for about 6 months, theoretically I will have a BA in Computer Science in one more year of study. Because of this gap I have been looking to find my way back into the work force to keep a roof over my head, etc, etc. I am very interested in being involved in the security side of the industry and have found that I tend to learn more on the job than by reading or putting together my own small scenarios with vm's on my own time. Looking around for work I have been keeping my eyes open for a low level position involving the security field because I think it has the potential to be very interesting and open the door to new possibilities in the future. I have between 5-6 years of work experience in both a systems administrator and business analyst capacity so I feel like I have something to offer to a potential employer, my problem seems to be finding one.

So how did you get into the industry? Any tips for a young guy making his way?

Thanks!

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Honestly, network with people like minded, get involved in doing what you want to do for a living, in groups outside the work place. Jobs are tough in every industry these days, and in IT, its even harder to get in with one company full time. Most places are switching to consultants, so look for companies that do just that, and work your way up, generally doing remote helpdesk at IT call centers, then network and deployment techs, road warriors who go out to businesses and hook up their networks, troubleshoot servers for small businesses, etc. Part of how you get a job these days, is also in who you know, so its as much a social means, as it is a skills test.

You could be the smartest, brightest IT person there is, but it won't do a hill of beans if you don't know who the people inside are looking for in IT people. HR might get you a preliminary interview because you have some certs under your belt, but in reality, what you can do and show what you know is more important than anything you put down on a resume. Walking the walk, not just talking the talk. Not saying a resume isn't important, as its your first impression without meeting someone face to face, but if you know people who have IT jobs, get in on the ground floor and work your way up and most of the time, its because you know someone who can help you get a foot in the door.

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Honestly, network with people like minded, get involved in doing what you want to do for a living, in groups outside the work place. Jobs are tough in every industry these days, and in IT, its even harder to get in with one company full time. Most places are switching to consultants, so look for companies that do just that, and work your way up, generally doing remote helpdesk at IT call centers, then network and deployment techs, road warriors who go out to businesses and hook up their networks, troubleshoot servers for small businesses, etc. Part of how you get a job these days, is also in who you know, so its as much a social means, as it is a skills test.

You could be the smartest, brightest IT person there is, but it won't do a hill of beans if you don't know who the people inside are looking for in IT people. HR might get you a preliminary interview because you have some certs under your belt, but in reality, what you can do and show what you know is more important than anything you put down on a resume. Walking the walk, not just talking the talk. Not saying a resume isn't important, as its your first impression without meeting someone face to face, but if you know people who have IT jobs, get in on the ground floor and work your way up and most of the time, its because you know someone who can help you get a foot in the door.

Some serious wisdom here, thanks for taking the time.

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