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new protection combo ... HDDVD+RFID ...


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source :vnunet?

DVD chips 'to kill illegal copying'

Embedded radio transmitter chips to track movie, music and software discs

A new technology is promising to put an end to DVD piracy

DVDs will soon be tracked with embedded radio transmitter chips to prevent copying and piracy, according to the company which makes movie discs for Warner, Disney, Fox and other major studios.

The technology, which can also be used for Blu-Ray and HD-DVD discs, will allow movie studios to remotely track individual discs as they travel from factories to retail shelves to consumers' homes.

Home DVD players will eventually be able to check on the chip embedded in a disc, and refuse to play discs which are copied or played in the 'wrong' geographical region, the companies behind the technology expect.

"This technology holds the potential to protect the intellectual property of music companies, film studios, gaming and software developers worldwide," said Gordon Yeh, chief executive of Ritek Corporation.

Ritek is the world's largest DVD maker, and its U-Tech subsidiary will make the discs.

U-Tech and IPICO, the company behind the RFID chips used in the discs, announced today that production of the 'chipped' DVDs will begin at U-Tech's main plant in Taiwan.

U-Tech's global network of factories stamps out some 500 million pre-recorded DVDs and CDs a month for major movie studios, recording studios and video games companies.

After ironing out bugs in the manufacturing process, U-Tech will work with major movie studios on a large-scale test of an RFID-based supply chain management process at its manufacturing plant and distribution centre in Australia.

RFID readers will then be built-in to home DVD players to extend the anti-copying technology into homes as part of a digital rights management system.

U-Tech described this as the "real end game" for the chip-on-disc technology, which would "eliminate optical disc piracy in the entertainment and IT sectors" .

IPICO claims that its RFID tags can be read from at least six metres away, and at a rate of thousands of tags per minute. The passive chips require no battery, as they are powered by the energy in radio waves from the RFID reader.

"I have envisioned using RFID to improve product visibility and enhance security in the optical disc industry for some time," said Yeh.

"Launching the chip-on-disc system has made this dream a reality and holds the potential to protect the intellectual property of music companies, film studios, gaming and software developers worldwide."

Gordon Westwater, president of IPICO, added: "[This is the] first step towards new international standards to safeguard optical media, and the subsequent adoption of the chip-on-disc concept as a global standard."

U-Tech Australia, where the project will undergo a large scale trial, did not reply today to vnunet.com's request for comment on the new embedded RFID chip process and the precise schedule for its rollout.

Press relations staff at U-Tech's office in Taiwan refused to provide more information about the technology.

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  • 3 weeks later...
That whole thing requires the player to be complient.... another reason to have a region free player.. but i guess now it's region/rfid free

i agree. Personally i think it's no big deal. There's no way that you can make a DVD that doesn't play on current DVD hardware, which means that if it can play it can be ripped.

Just another example of the complete lack of respect that media companies have for their customers.

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Its interesting, the british libary are demanding DRM removal tools because it throws a gigantic spanner into the works when your trying to maintain an archive. We'll be the generation that won't have anything to show our kids due to DRM.

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The sad state of the world is that if consumers don't take a stand and refuse to buy this crippled technology, big business will continute to flock to it. I, for one, will not be spending my hard earned cash on a drive that is disfunctional.

It's getting to the point where you'll need to put a modchip in your PC in order to do things that should be totally legal under even the US's shitty copyright law.

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What if your ISP can detect linux, and due to its lack of support for DRM, heavily filter your connection or maybe turn it off all together? Intel just made a chip which lets your ISP reboot your PC from there end, add that to Trusted Computing/Paladium and its a dark picture thats painted.

The ONLY way we can stop this crap is if we use the media companys scare tactics and FUD against them. No, its not nice, and not right, but this is a war and we should start fighting it before its to late.

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The ONLY way we can stop this crap is if we use the media companys scare tactics and FUD against them. No, its not nice, and not right, but this is a war and we should start fighting it before its to late.

Fighting a corparation's fire with there own fire can be entertaining, at least for a short time :twisted:

Speaking of protexcted media. When will some open source enthusiasts release a open source player and open source media?

I mean, there is the hand held Linux platform, but where is our OGG player and OGG DVD?

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You know a few well placed charges could solve all all problems... oh you're working on some new better DR*BOOM* oh I'm did you not want me to blow up you're building I'm sorry I misunderstood I thought you were creating DR*BOOM* sorry.. I can get a little punchy

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What if your ISP can detect linux, and due to its lack of support for DRM, heavily filter your connection or maybe turn it off all together? Intel just made a chip which lets your ISP reboot your PC from there end, add that to Trusted Computing/Paladium and its a dark picture thats painted.

The ONLY way we can stop this crap is if we use the media companys scare tactics and FUD against them. No, its not nice, and not right, but this is a war and we should start fighting it before its to late.

I quite agree, I don't wanna sound like a mental, computer-obsessed, privacy freak ready to obliterate anyone saying "if you're all legit there's no problem" but it's time we took action... We NEED to stop (or at least slow down) this process before all of the new equipment we buy can is full of back-doors, remote control functions, ways to tell if we're "being naughty" and general crap that tells us what we can and can't do with few if no ways around it...

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Personally, I dislike a marketing team having more access to my computer than the police. There are no checks and measures, no laws about this, so they can do exactly what they want. Take sonys rootkit debacle for instance. If i'd made a product that rootkitted your PC, i'd go to jail. Sony? Well, they had to give everyone a replacement CD, an $7.50 cheque and a free DRM'd album. We need clear laws protecting the consumer from companys that massivly over reach there limits. France tried to make a law that required Apple to make there music playable on other players, music people had leaglly paid for. Apples response? They threw a tantrum and threatened to pull out of France, then the US gov accused the french goverment of aiding & abetting piracy. If you look at the legal terminolgy, its moved from you owning a CD, to you mearly buying a liscene to play that music. Which is a MASSIVE shift, and also allows them to impose draconian terms to any agreement. We all know the record companys want pay for play, and unless we do something, your CD player will have a (metaphorical) coin slot in it before long.

And people seem to love this crap. If I wrote a liscene that in return for playing my music, stated that I had the legal right to sleep with your wife/daughter people would still click ok.

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I completely agree VaKo, I did have a fairly long reply here, but while helping someone I copied the text, re-used the browser window by accident and managed to overwrite the clipboard so I'll stick with "I agree" for now...

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Its a sad day when hardware is DRMd

We're sorry but you can only use this DVD player in 2 rooms per house. Please return this DVD player to the original room!

Please return this player to the ground floor to play this movie.

This player will be automatically locked after 3 attempts to play content while it is not positioned on the ground floor.

The manufacturer has been notified.

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RIAA and MPAA and all that shit is really starting to pissed me off.

at the point that i stopped buying originals, i always download from the e2k a movie, if i like it, I go and buy it, looks fair 2 me, if it's bad, I won't.

now I'm looking less than 1/4 of the movies i used to look and stopped buying dvd's and cd's, the only thing we can do (unless you are a lawer with money and time spare, which surely most dont) is stop buy material, i don't see another way.

I don't buy protected discs anymore, if they are region 0 no problem.

same with dvd's, if they are region free, i could buy them.

if they go forward with this drm, we have 2 choices, do a nice workaround :) or stop using it. either way they loose (we only loose in one of them).

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