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A Good Beginner Friendly Language


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So i have been interested in computer programing for a while now and i have a few months of time on my hands what i was wondering

what are the first computer languages a beginner should learn

places to get hands on training/workshops i could do on my own computer

what would be the ideal order in which to learn the many different forms of coding i.e (learn Pearl then C# then C++ Ect...)

i know a bit about orders instructions but not much so any help would be great thanks

Bye!

code

if Happiness == true GOTO a

if happiness =/= true GOTO b

:a Party

:b suicide

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C would be a good language to start with. Then once you have mastered it, you could move into C++ and eventually web scripting language such as PHP and Javascript.

Edited by Infiltrator
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C would be a good language to start with. Then once you have mastered it, you could move into C++ and eventually web scripting language such as PHP and Javascript.

There are pro's and con's to starting to learn using any language. I would recommend that you decide what you are wanting to do before learning. Are you wanting to learn how to create web applications, if so then look at Perl or PHP, and JavaScript. If you are wanting to learn how to create games then look at C or C++. If you are wanting to learn how to create an operating system then look at assembler and C.

If you are just looking to learn how to program then use something along the lines of Python and after you have the basics of the language down then concentrate on the actual design of your programs. You will find that you can transfer most of the algorithm knowledge from one language to another, and that is what makes the difference.

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There are pro's and con's to starting to learn using any language. I would recommend that you decide what you are wanting to do before learning. Are you wanting to learn how to create web applications, if so then look at Perl or PHP, and JavaScript. If you are wanting to learn how to create games then look at C or C++. If you are wanting to learn how to create an operating system then look at assembler and C.

If you are just looking to learn how to program then use something along the lines of Python and after you have the basics of the language down then concentrate on the actual design of your programs. You will find that you can transfer most of the algorithm knowledge from one language to another, and that is what makes the difference.

As Jason pointed out, it all depends on what area in programing you want to move in. It can be quite frustrating at first to work out what language you want to learn. But first you need to find out what kind of applications you want to build.

I myself use PHP and JavaScript for web programming, simply because I like building web applications and its fun.

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I would definitely recommend learning a little bit of C as it gives you a good grasp of how the computer works with integers, floats, endianess etc. Then start learning Python. Although as both Jason and Infiltrator have said it really depends on what type of programming your going to be doing.

Python is a good all round language but if you're doing something algorithmic that needs to be completed FAST then choose C or even Assembly if you want to torture yourself.

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I'll be honest, I had trouble trying to learn C and still to this day, have no clue what I was doing. I only worked from examples and when I wanted to create something, googled for specific code chunks and modified to my liking. However, PHP is pretty easy to pick up. I am by no means an expert, but its code is elegant and straight forward, and similar to working with basic XHTML and Javascript, while many people tell me its like C+, I never get that feeling when working with it. I started with simple windows BAT scripting and VBS files, html, then worked my way through Visual Basic 6 (which I still think is easier than .net crap of todays visual studio) and then up to more web stuff like php and javascript, a little ajax here and there, but most ajax stuff just makes calls to preexisting libraries like jquery, mootools, etc, where you link to something like googles latest jquery files or the jquery site itself.

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I'll be honest, I had trouble trying to learn C and still to this day, have no clue what I was doing. I only worked from examples and when I wanted to create something, googled for specific code chunks and modified to my liking. However, PHP is pretty easy to pick up. I am by no means an expert, but its code is elegant and straight forward, and similar to working with basic XHTML and Javascript, while many people tell me its like C+, I never get that feeling when working with it. I started with simple windows BAT scripting and VBS files, html, then worked my way through Visual Basic 6 (which I still think is easier than .net crap of todays visual studio) and then up to more web stuff like php and javascript, a little ajax here and there, but most ajax stuff just makes calls to preexisting libraries like jquery, mootools, etc, where you link to something like googles latest jquery files or the jquery site itself.

Mmm, by no means do I know C, but it taught me about integers, the size of integers, etc. What happens with the computer at a low level.

I love PHP as well, it's very clean, it get's hated on a lot for being slow, and it is but it's a fun language.

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  • 4 weeks later...

There are pro's and con's to starting to learn using any language. I would recommend that you decide what you are wanting to do before learning. Are you wanting to learn how to create web applications, if so then look at Perl or PHP, and JavaScript. If you are wanting to learn how to create games then look at C or C++. If you are wanting to learn how to create an operating system then look at assembler and C.

IMO this paragraph above is the most useful one in this thread. I would say that if you are just starting to learn to program and you are doing it for fun/a learning experience, then alot of the languages mentioned above are probably not that good an idea. The reason why is that I think if you are going to learn something and put your time or mental energy into it, it should also be useful. I think realistically, you are probably not going to use C to solve day-to-day problems.

I would recommend starting with python. It is my the second language (after Java). I think it is the best language to learn to solve common day-to-day issues. It is also rather straightforward to learn. I might also recommend Perl, but I have found it awkward and I would agree with the common wisdom that it is only a language you should use if you are going to be programming very often with it, for extended periods of time.

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