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That's pretty neat actually but I love how all the comments are attacking windows with complete and utter FUD. Why are so many people like that? They just make the rest of us Linux and Mac OS X users look bad. :/ Same with the windows fan boys they make users of windows look bad too. I think those fan boys should relax before they have a heart attack lol. Although I do agree with the statement about Mac OS being good but the hardware sucking they really do need to bring it up to spec for that price I could by an Alienware with almost 4x the power :/

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Isn't 64bit file system enough, why go with a 128bit file system. Its not like we need that much of storage footprint anyway. An average home user will never consume more than 1 or 2 TB.

But yeah, just like IP V4, we thought we would never run out of ip addresses and statistics have shown that we are now only at 5% of IP address v4 left.

But it would be nice to have that kind of storage footprint for storing rainbow tables.

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128bit file system = Windows Permissions + ZFS = would be sweet. The reason its going to 128bit is not because of home users, its because of SAN's and Enterprise stuff. Also, NEVER EVER SAY "this is more than people need, why build it?". History will prove you wrong.

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128bit file system = Windows Permissions + ZFS = would be sweet. The reason its going to 128bit is not because of home users, its because of SAN's and Enterprise stuff. Also, NEVER EVER SAY "this is more than people need, why build it?". History will prove you wrong.

You are absolutely right, History will prove one wrong.

We are living on a digital world, where information is growing every second and if we don't deal with it now, we will have problems in the future.

Edit: by the way, do you know what Windows 7 x64 storage footprint is?

Edited by Infiltrator
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Its between 256TB and 16TB, depending on cluster size (16TB @ 4K). Which is affordable using 3TB disks and something like Windows Home Server, or a cheap SAN.

So if I increase the cluster size, I will consequently be increasing the storage size.

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No.

Maximum Volume Size

In theory, the maximum NTFS volume size is 2^64−1 clusters. However, the maximum NTFS volume size as implemented in Windows XP Professional is 2^32−1 clusters. For example, using 64 KB (64 × 1024 bytes) clusters, the maximum Windows XP NTFS volume size is 256 TB (256 × 10244 bytes) minus 64 KB. Using the default cluster size of 4 KB, the maximum NTFS volume size is 16 TB minus 4 KB. (Both of these are vastly higher than the 128 GB (128 × 10243 bytes) limit lifted in Windows XP SP1.) Because partition tables on master boot record (MBR) disks only support partition sizes up to 2 TB, dynamic or GPT volumes must be used to create NTFS volumes over 2 TB. Booting from a GPT volume to a Windows environment requires a system with EFI and 64-bit support.

In order to support larger partition sizes than 16TB on an NTFS volume, you need to increase the cluster size above the default of 4KB. Changing the cluster size will itself have no effect on the underlying capacity of the storage media.

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Anyone still use 3.5" floppy disks? I wonder if windows 8 will still have floppy support..

I do, just not in a computer, lol. I use them with an ETC Express 48/96 Light board. Bought in 2001, this thing has 16 bit faders, 192 channels, and 1024 DMX outputs. What's more, the entire system, including light patching, 600 cues and 500 groups, can all be saved to a 1.44mb floppy disk via it's built in floppy drive!

BTW you don't know how hard it is to find more floppy disks for it nowadays lol

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I do, just not in a computer, lol. I use them with an ETC Express 48/96 Light board. Bought in 2001, this thing has 16 bit faders, 192 channels, and 1024 DMX outputs. What's more, the entire system, including light patching, 600 cues and 500 groups, can all be saved to a 1.44mb floppy disk via it's built in floppy drive!

BTW you don't know how hard it is to find more floppy disks for it nowadays lol

http://www.google.com/products?hl=en&q...sa=N&tab=wf

They still sell USB Floppy drives, so people still use them for various reasons. Your example is reason enough. Its just mainly used for legacy equipment and data retrieval these days, or the occasional BIOS update in machines that only use a floppy to update.

I have some laying around, but no machines that can use them.

Edited by digip
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No.

In order to support larger partition sizes than 16TB on an NTFS volume, you need to increase the cluster size above the default of 4KB. Changing the cluster size will itself have no effect on the underlying capacity of the storage media.

Sorry I meant, that if I increase the cluster size I will be increasing the OS file system footprint itself, not the hard drive capacity itself, which would be impossible.

Edited by Infiltrator
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Sorry I meant, that if I increase the cluster size I will be increasing the OS file system footprint itself, not the hard drive capacity itself, which would be impossible.

The file system metadata would be the same size, there would be allot more empty space left unusable for every file smaller than the sector size and every file that has a size that is not exactly divisible by the sector size. That is to say, with a 64K sector size every file will take up a minimum of 64KB on the disk regardless if it is 1 byte or 63 KB.

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The file system metadata would be the same size, there would be allot more empty space left unusable for every file smaller than the sector size and every file that has a size that is not exactly divisible by the sector size. That is to say, with a 64K sector size every file will take up a minimum of 64KB on the disk regardless if it is 1 byte or 63 KB.

Got it thank you Sparda.

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