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Setting Up Local Dns With Bind Using Webmin


Charles
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I want to set up a DNS server that will do both forward lookup (and maybe reverse lookup, but I don't think that would be needed) for the local machines and forward any requests that are not local onto the internet.

I was trying to follow a tutorial on how to set up a caching name server and that seemed to work, but I am a bit clueless as to how to set up this DNS server to work with DHCP, so that anything assigned an IP from DHCP is added to the DNS database.

Any ideas? I am thinking I might just create A records and leave it at that.

I think I need to create a master zone for my local network and add the clients to it, but I am not 100% positive. Most of the how-tos I found did everything from the command-line, not thru webmin.

Any help would be appreciated.

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I want to set up a DNS server that will do both forward lookup (and maybe reverse lookup, but I don't think that would be needed) for the local machines and forward any requests that are not local onto the internet.

I was trying to follow a tutorial on how to set up a caching name server and that seemed to work, but I am a bit clueless as to how to set up this DNS server to work with DHCP, so that anything assigned an IP from DHCP is added to the DNS database.

Any ideas? I am thinking I might just create A records and leave it at that.

I think I need to create a master zone for my local network and add the clients to it, but I am not 100% positive. Most of the how-tos I found did everything from the command-line, not thru webmin.

Any help would be appreciated.

Configuring BIND via Webadmin: http://rimuhosting.com/support/bindviawebmin.jsp

http://www.beer.org.uk/bsacdns/

Edited by Infiltrator
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Thanks! I'll be giving it a shot later today. :)

Configuring DNS in Windows Server is a whole hell of a lot easier, but at least Webmin makes it semi-manageable.

EDIT: Is there a way to ping a host without having to use the domain name? I tried setting up an alias, but it won't allow duplicate entires.

Also: Do I need to set up the DNS server in a chroot environment? I seem to recall having read that it would be a wise.

Edited by Charles
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Thanks! I'll be giving it a shot later today. :)

Configuring DNS in Windows Server is a whole hell of a lot easier, but at least Webmin makes it semi-manageable.

EDIT: Is there a way to ping a host without having to use the domain name? I tried setting up an alias, but it won't allow duplicate entires.

Also: Do I need to set up the DNS server in a chroot environment? I seem to recall having read that it would be a wise.

1. If you know the host ip address than you could ping it.

2. I think that alias you are trying to set up should be called something else.

3. http://ftp.gnumonks.org/pub/doc/chroot-howto.html

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Right now I can ping the machines just by using the hostname: e.g., "thor"

When I set up a test dns server, I needed to use the entire domain name: e.g., "thor.local"

I don't have to do that currently for the windows boxes, but I think they are just using NetBIOS broadcasts to confirm the machine name.

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Right now I can ping the machines just by using the hostname: e.g., "thor"

When I set up a test dns server, I needed to use the entire domain name: e.g., "thor.local"

I don't have to do that currently for the windows boxes, but I think they are just using NetBIOS broadcasts to confirm the machine name.

Some users would set up their DNS server, as "thor.some top level domain" like .net, .com but what you did is the best practice and the correct way.

Any one who understands how DNS server works would agree to that.

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I am not sure where I read about that (if I read about it at all.. ) but if you use a TLD like a .com or .net, you need to register it, since it'll be out on the internet. If I recall correctly, if you use something like .local or even .office, it won't be going out on the internet.

I could be wrong of course.

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I am not sure where I read about that (if I read about it at all.. ) but if you use a TLD like a .com or .net, you need to register it, since it'll be out on the internet. If I recall correctly, if you use something like .local or even .office, it won't be going out on the internet.

I could be wrong of course.

A FQDN can contain anything you want on your local lan if its defined in DNS and on the machine its pointing to. You can have .net, .com, or .whatever you want on your lan if you wanted without any problems. Your local DNS server isnt going to register your local lan devices with the internets dns servers, its only going to forward the requests to his own gateway on behalf of the lcoal machine if he cant resolve the address locally to his own database of addresses.

Understand though, if you set up www.microsoft.com on your local lans dns server, your machines will come to you instead of the real website, so dont use an address that is on the internet if you need to reach it, but thats just common sense.

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I am not sure where I read about that (if I read about it at all.. ) but if you use a TLD like a .com or .net, you need to register it, since it'll be out on the internet. If I recall correctly, if you use something like .local or even .office, it won't be going out on the internet.

I could be wrong of course.

It doesn't necessary need to be registered, you can set it up as TLD and have it operating as a local domain. I've done that in the past. Nothing wrong happened to it. Just like Digip said its common sense.

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Thanks for the info guys!

No problems, glad could help!

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I am pretty sure you will need DHCP, but apart from that you will need to have your DNS working properly. I have found these article that can explain better.

http://www.petri.co.il/windows-DNS-globalnames-zone.htm

http://social.technet.microsoft.com/Forums...e2-7e6e16791363

http://forums.techarena.in/server-scripting/1201319.htm

http://us.generation-nt.com/help/set+dns+s...+using+dhcp/?or

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I figured it out: had to set the "option domain-name" setting on the DHCP server to the domain that I was using for the FQDN.

Now I just need to figure out what all I need to do to secure said DNS server. That'll be fun.

Edited by Charles
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