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Hacker High School


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HELLO ALL!

I'm actually a college student that just graduated high school my self this past August (8-23-09) and am currently in college. In my spare time I teach and tutor kids in various IT/computer topics. In my many months of doing this (and I love doing this) I've taught middle and high school kids who are very keen and just have a natural knack for this stuff, everything from something as basic as helping them getting their A+ certification to network administration with windows and linux servers, and even helping the occasional would be hacker kid how to do some basic penetration testing (the rightly 'ethical' way.). I love doing this so much that I've invested a great deal of time in buying my kiddo's books, equipment, lab materials, and etc. It's gotten to the point now where I've got enough kids, parents, and teachers who like me and are willing to back me up so that I can get a little informal school/class going on where I can teach kids the basics of IT security and slowly get them into some of the more fun and practical sides of hacking (NOT cracking). I've been looking around to see if there was some kind of program out there that was already doing what it is that I'm trying to start up and do. CEH is way to advanced and dry for kids, plus (sry to those who do have a CEH) after looking at the CEH curriculum, it seems pretty crappy. It almost looks like the author of that course just googled hacking. The best and closest thing that I've been able to find was this free curriculum created and endorsed by ISECOM:

http://www.hackerhighschool.org/

It's a very short lesson plan and feels very lacking in a lot of areas, especially the labs. I basically want to use this as a foundation and add more topics, labs, explanations, and etc to make it not only more accurate, but easy and from to learn from.

So please, to everybody who's interested, please take a moment to look at the lessons (it won't take long, trust me, it'll take like 30 min max.) and post any ideas on what can/should be added, removed, done differently, or any other good suggestive ideas. If anyone has any questions, please just pm me. Thanks in advance guys and lets use this so I can help end the script kiddie madness.

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HELLO ALL!

I'm actually a college student that just graduated high school my self this past August (8-23-09) and am currently in college. In my spare time I teach and tutor kids in various IT/computer topics. In my many months of doing this (and I love doing this) I've taught middle and high school kids who are very keen and just have a natural knack for this stuff, everything from something as basic as helping them getting their A+ certification to network administration with windows and linux servers, and even helping the occasional would be hacker kid how to do some basic penetration testing (the rightly 'ethical' way.). I love doing this so much that I've invested a great deal of time in buying my kiddo's books, equipment, lab materials, and etc. It's gotten to the point now where I've got enough kids, parents, and teachers who like me and are willing to back me up so that I can get a little informal school/class going on where I can teach kids the basics of IT security and slowly get them into some of the more fun and practical sides of hacking (NOT cracking). I've been looking around to see if there was some kind of program out there that was already doing what it is that I'm trying to start up and do. CEH is way to advanced and dry for kids, plus (sry to those who do have a CEH) after looking at the CEH curriculum, it seems pretty crappy. It almost looks like the author of that course just googled hacking. The best and closest thing that I've been able to find was this free curriculum created and endorsed by ISECOM:

http://www.hackerhighschool.org/

It's a very short lesson plan and feels very lacking in a lot of areas, especially the labs. I basically want to use this as a foundation and add more topics, labs, explanations, and etc to make it not only more accurate, but easy and from to learn from.

So please, to everybody who's interested, please take a moment to look at the lessons (it won't take long, trust me, it'll take like 30 min max.) and post any ideas on what can/should be added, removed, done differently, or any other good suggestive ideas. If anyone has any questions, please just pm me. Thanks in advance guys and lets use this so I can help end the script kiddie madness.

i looked into hackerhighschool years ago. it was pretty outdated even when it started. even back then it only told me what i already knew. dont get me wrong its a great way for people who havent got any knowledge in security to get a start but theres so much that needs more detail that i cant even begin to list it

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If your after a curriculum it may pay to send Sam Bowne an email and ask for his suggestions. I have been following his stuff since he first did a talk at defcon on introducing a hacking class at his educational institution.

I must say I am impressed with his work and easy to follow tutorials, its great to see a teacher who loves what he teaches (sounds kind of like yourself). I wish I had people like this when I did my network security course.

So jah it may pay to send him an email.

http://samsclass.info/

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i looked into hackerhighschool years ago. it was pretty outdated even when it started. even back then it only told me what i already knew. dont get me wrong its a great way for people who havent got any knowledge in security to get a start but theres so much that needs more detail that i cant even begin to list it

My friend, I couldn't agree more. This is why I wana try and get the input from the community on topics that are both static and dynamic in nature and to make and keep this thing as updated as possible.

If your after a curriculum it may pay to send Sam Bowne an email and ask for his suggestions. I have been following his stuff since he first did a talk at defcon on introducing a hacking class at his educational institution.

I must say I am impressed with his work and easy to follow tutorials, its great to see a teacher who loves what he teaches (sounds kind of like yourself). I wish I had people like this when I did my network security course.

So jah it may pay to send him an email.

http://samsclass.info/

Awesome, I just sent him an email.

But everyone has to start some where. I just want to provide a safe hacking environment for kids so that they can have a good time, learn a very profitable and valuable skill, and most of all mature from this experience.

I've been thinking a bit more and have compiled a small list on some things that I think would be a good thing to have taken care of first aside from the basic hardware/OS/networking fundamentals:

.Basic programming and scripting: (what do ya'll think would be a nice easy to learn programming language? Ruby, Java, Python...? A language that's cross platform?)

.The toolkit: (linux/windows: Password crackers, port scanners, 802.11 analyzers, fuzzers....?)

.Questions that they should be asking themselves (Why do I hack?, what should I hack?, What kind of security do they have?, etc...)

Please tell me what else should be thought of. Any ideas will be greatly appreciated. (XD)

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But everyone has to start some where. I just want to provide a safe hacking environment for kids so that they can have a good time, learn a very profitable and valuable skill, and most of all mature from this experience.

have you ever heard of hackits.de? it was a hacking game site that went down. you registered an account and it had tasks for you to do which you gained ranks for completing. everything from writing code to decyphering a string of ROT13 text.

if you can find a more detailed description and get a project like that going again it would be a great place for kids and adults alike to pick up better security practices. but theres always the darkside that it will teach people how to do the black hat stuff as well. so its a fine line between preparing people and arming them. you might wanna aim your age group to around 17+. not saying someone younger couldnt handle it without going blackhat. i know a lot of 12 year olds that can do a lot of shit. its just that in general most dont see the difference and its the majority that needs to be watched lol

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have you ever heard of hackits.de? it was a hacking game site that went down. you registered an account and it had tasks for you to do which you gained ranks for completing. everything from writing code to decyphering a string of ROT13 text.

if you can find a more detailed description and get a project like that going again it would be a great place for kids and adults alike to pick up better security practices. but theres always the darkside that it will teach people how to do the black hat stuff as well. so its a fine line between preparing people and arming them. you might wanna aim your age group to around 17+. not saying someone younger couldnt handle it without going blackhat. i know a lot of 12 year olds that can do a lot of shit. its just that in general most dont see the difference and its the majority that needs to be watched lol

Dude, I totally remember that site. Than was one of my favorite places to learn next to hackerslab.org (which is also shut down). I plan to use the site hackthissite.org which I've found to be pretty nice and was very similar to hackits.de. Would you or anyone else happen to know of any other sites like this. They're great because of the mental exercises that it makes you go through as well as making you learn how websites and some of its basic security works.

As far as watching out for those kiddies that want to use their powers for the dark side of the force, that's another reason why I want to start this hackers school started up. The honest will more than likely stay honest, it's those other ones that I want to try and snag ahead of time and give them an outlet where they can hack and learn till their hearts content. If they're going to be trying to do things for experimental purposes, it might as well be in a safe environment where they won't get into trouble, plus as I said, there's a culture behind what it is they are/will be doing along with a code of ethics which they may be unaware of that they need to be aware of... Not trying to save the world here, just trying to provide a nice environment for them script kiddies/hacker wannabe kids where they can actually learn something thoroughly instead of looking at how-tos on youtubz.

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What about middle-aged latecomers to the computer world? Like me? :rolleyes:

Anyone who left school when I did [1992] missed out on computer education big time. 95% of people finishing high school did not know how to cut and paste in the early 90s. The teaching philosophy of computers in that era was "computer equals typewriter". It was pathetic. So bear in mind that many people like me have to learn computers in spite of a school education so bad that I may as well have used cardboard boxes with painted buttons. Worse still, school never mentioned the internet. Computer technology came to an absolute halt in 1992, never to get better. I first heard of the internet in 1992 and first used it in 1999 - seven years after leaving school.

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What about middle-aged latecomers to the computer world? Like me? :rolleyes:

Anyone who left school when I did [1992] missed out on computer education big time. 95% of people finishing high school did not know how to cut and paste in the early 90s. The teaching philosophy of computers in that era was "computer equals typewriter". It was pathetic. So bear in mind that many people like me have to learn computers in spite of a school education so bad that I may as well have used cardboard boxes with painted buttons. Worse still, school never mentioned the internet. Computer technology came to an absolute halt in 1992, never to get better. I first heard of the internet in 1992 and first used it in 1999 - seven years after leaving school.

ive noticed a running thing with people from that particular age group that dont seem to understand.

they wouldnt have any problem understanding if they would try. they look at whats in front of them and give up before they start. rather than read everthing, break it down, and try to understand or research (by research i meant google) what they dont know.

this drives me crazy! but at the same time cements my position as the IT guy.

in all honesty technology is very simple (as long as you have the internet) becasue you can read and understand it logically. thanks to the internet you can research anything you dont know in a very short time.

in essence all it takes to UNDERSTAND technology is to research and try.

however do not confuse my meaning. understanding technology and being a hacker is 2 different things. the former requires you to simply read the research of others. while the latter requires you to adapt, learn, push forward without knowing for sure whats going to happen.

understanding technology allows you to use it

being a hacker allows you to create and advance it

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in all honesty technology is very simple (as long as you have the internet) becasue you can read and understand it logically. thanks to the internet you can research anything you dont know in a very short time.

in essence all it takes to UNDERSTAND technology is to research and try.

however do not confuse my meaning. understanding technology and being a hacker is 2 different things. the former requires you to simply read the research of others. while the latter requires you to adapt, learn, push forward without knowing for sure whats going to happen.

understanding technology allows you to use it

being a hacker allows you to create and advance it

Dude well said! (I'll have to write that quote down.) A lot of people just take one or maybe two looks at a piece of tech and are sent through the loop because they think it's so damn complicated (and in all fairness, some of it really is.) Google has been my educational institution ever since I realized that the public education that I was forced to accept was bull $%!7 and I was able to learn subjects in a fraction of the amount of time that it took everyone else. But RogueHart you do have to admit, sometimes it's because of people's ignorance or unwillingness to understand that people like us are able to make a paycheck. Not saying that it's bad or anything, everyone just happens to have their specialty/niche.

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Well the quote on hack this site reads hack to learn, don't learn to hack. While this statement = true the fact of the matter is you learn more in a controlled lab environment and the added bonus is you can't get into any real trouble and don't feel so bad when when you accidentally cause a DoS on the network.

<.<

>.>

..... I like accidentally did this while probing my Tafe's network. My bad.

hahaha I remember those really bad high school I.T classes. It was the mid 90's for me and the class consisted of copying shit off a piece of paper into MS word. Back then I actually hated IT and found it all boring. It wasn't until I got my first computer when I was 16 and had dial up in 1995 that I started to get into it.

I just had flash backs of writing my own chat control web page to mess with beseen HTML chat pages that were more like message boards (WING DINGS FONT FOR EVERYONE). Oh and how could I forget win nuking netbios port 139 with out of bound packets. =D

Ah the good old days when there was no such thing as firewalls and network address translation *sniff*.

1995 = Security? lol WTF is that????

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XD

lol, dude, I think I was in 2'nd grade or something back in 1995. I didn't know crap about computers except that on windows 95 I could login by pressing the escape key and get admin access by going into safe mode. But I will say this, even though I was a little fella' I learned how to do the blue box the pay phones in my area. (I cheated, my dad was actually into the whole foss movement thing and was really into computers and stuff, so he showed me how to do that... Yes, I had a very weird and fortunate childhood. Thank you Captain Crunch).

I'm still working on tweaking the stuff from hackerhighschool.org and, but between my school and work, it's going a bit slow, maybe in about another week or two i might have it done. When I do get it finished I'd like to post it (or a link to it) and get some feed back from everyone if possible.

I still haven't gotten a reply back from Sam Bowne. Sent him a couple of emails already, but I don't want to pester the guy to death.

Is there anyone else that ya'll can recommend whom I can contact for some advice?

Oh and going back about "hack to learn not learn to hack", I take the stance of "learn to hack so you can hack to learn", you know... learn 'how to learn' first so you can learn more on your own (@_@). And hacking is exactly what it is that I want to show them how to do... NOT cracking.

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hahah you lucky man, thats pretty awesome. I missed out on the whole boxing and war dialing thing due to budget and knowledge.

Its a pity Sam Bowne aint got back to you, he would surely have some good ideas. Guess he is a busy man and he may be on holidays seeing as its still the xmas period. Not so sure about holidays in the states though seeing as I am an Aussie.

As for course structure I would suggest starting off with the standard and somewhat boring Ethics, legality and mindset. Then move on to some fundamentals like OSI and TCP/IP but base attack vectors around what layer the exploit attacks. Not to sure on what program fundamentals you should cover seeing as I previously studied networking and couldn't code my way out of a wet paper bag.

Discus the security Triad (Physical, Network and Data) and the importance of each slice of the pie and what attacks occur in each section. I would try and structure the curriculum in the same sort of order. As a quick example Physical, rooting the local machine, network sniffing and Data breaking NTLM passwords... something along those lines.

Do some stuff on enumeration like johnny long's google hacking and iron geeks cyber stalking. CBT nuggets did a fairly decent explanation on it in their CEH tutorial (downlaod from rapid share). I would also cover stuff like NMAP and some of its advanced scanning features and some banner/intel grabbing with net cat.

Discuss and demonstrate Denial of Service attacks and how to mitigate the risk. HTTP flooders, slowlaris, Syn attacks, wireless de authing etc.

After that I guess some fun with sniffers, ARP/DNS poisoning, SSL strip both over the wire and wireless. Wifi hacking is also worth covering to.

Metasploit basic overview and using payloads (I honestly don't know a great deal about metasploit or autopwn).

Fun with Rainbow tables on NTLM passwords n such.

I also think its great to demo the attack and then follow it up with another demo which demonstrates how to protect mitigate against that attack vector.

If you are in to programing I guess you could get into the reverse engineering side of things. Hardware hacks would be also awesome to do but the cost association to projects can get expensive.

Then again having a good lab to do this sort of thing can get expensive to a certain extent. It would be awesome to have a mini corporate network. Say 3 cisco routers. Two of which acting as two separate interstate branches or something, 1 doing frame relay emulating the cloud. 1 cisco switch at each branch office with VlANS enabled and a virtual machine or two at each branch office ruuning what ever server operating system you feel like. Chuck a few virtual clients on for laughs and your attackers running Backtrack 4 linux penetration distro. =D

Some refernce's for you that may come in handy for course outlines, tutorials, pen testing distros.

DVL exploitanle distro

Remote Exploit Forums n wikki have plenty of tutorials

Offensive Security Training Grab ideas for topics

Security Tube youtube for security tutorials

iron geek Good for tutorials

milw0rm Exploit code and has some video tutorials too

Johhny Long google hacking pdf Meh i failed at finding his website from a quick google search.

Anyways gotta go and pick up the missus before she kills me for being late, hope this helps. XD

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Hey, yeah, there's so many different places to start out. Best way to learn though, is to set up a server and let the kids hack into it. Teach them the basics and let them get into it. That's how I started learning (other than hackits.de which RogueHart mentioned). Show them how things work and suddenly they'll be figuring things out for themselves. I know personally that reading a tutorial didn't help me as much as coding my own programs and learning the different (safer) coding techniques did.

On a side note (and I realize this could be considered advertising, but I feel it would be relevant to the thread), me and a few of my buddies from hackits are starting up a new site, it's going to be a forum, tutorials, and before long a challenge site. I would love for you to check it out, and maybe when it gets bigger you'll be able to use it for getting information to share with the kids you're teaching: http://www.t3kstorm.com/forums/

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kudos to everyone who's pm'd me on this and thrown some awesome resources my way. Like I said I'm, I'm still working on a general outline of things to go through. I'll be out of town for about a week and will try to get it finished by the time I get back and would like to get feed back from anyone who's willing to look over it. But please keep throwing me your suggestions, thoughts, ideas, and any additional resources that you know of.

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I know some other school teachers trying to revamp the hacker high school circ. Until then here are some resources for you at the college level and at the high school level. These are some great opportunities for high school students. Also where are you attending school? I have my master degree in info sec...I was able to have a lot of fun during my research in some great topic of cyber war and cyber terrorism and the current threats of the cyber network. I hope this helps. Send me a PM if you want more info or the contact for the teacher working on changing the hacker high school circ. Enjoy.

DC3 - DC3 Forensic Challenge - hxxp://dc3.mil/challenge/2010/

Cyber Defense Education - hxxp://www.cyberdefenseeducation.info/

NIATEC - hxxp://niatec.info/

National Collegiate Cyber Defense Competition - hxxp://nationalccdc.org/

National Cyber Security Education Coalition - hxxp://www.icsec.org/

SANS Netwars - hxxp://www.sans.org/netwars/

IMPACT - hxxp://www.impact-alliance.org/

Cyber Patriot - High School Cyber Defense Competition - hxxp://www.highschoolcdc.com/

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hack to learn, don't learn to hack

That. Security is all fine and good, but hacking is much broader. See, here's how it works for me:

I've been interested in a great number of things over the course of my productive computing life, and they pretty much all bleed in together. What I learn, when messing with bluetooth or IR or GPS or whatever often comes in very handy while doing just about anything else. While experimenting I code as much as I can myself, because simply using a premade app won't give me the understanding I need. As an example, if I just fire up TomTom, yes, I can get the information I need to know where I am, but that tells me nothing of how TomTom works, or how a GPS receiver works, or what data is provided, or how it's formatted or interpreted. By writing my own code, I get to see every last bit of data which is required, and I get to see how it all fits together, what it means, how it's used. Even the stuff you don't normally get to see because it's used in internal calculations or is just extraneous data.

Simply by wondering what goes over a GPS cable (or over the bluetooth airwaves, in this case) I learnt:

1) How to listen to a device over serial

1a) How to do that over bluetooth

2) How to XOR checksum data both for integrity checking incoming data and to provide integrity data while transmitting

3) What the NMEA GPS data was and what it meant

4) I sharpened up my coding skills by writing more reusable code

5) How to better dissect incoming data as quickly and efficiently as possible

6) How to send commands to control the GPS chipset, including the correct way to send the data (CR/LF/etc)

I then realised I could use the data in combination with other things. I used the programming knowledge I got from the project to integrate SMS capabilities into my test programs so I could SMS my laptop and have it SMS me back with info on where it was using the GPS data, so I then had to learn how to talk to a serial GSM modem (commonly found in 3G modems), which automatically meant more learning:

1) How to listen and talk to GSM modems (they often have similar command sets, based on the Hayes/AT set)

2) Further refining of reusable code and efficient transmission/reception of data

3) How to send and receive SMS messages using AT commands (it's trickier than you might think)

4) How to multithread my code (read: how not to make my apps lock hard) and how to pass data between threads

I also used the GPS stuff I'd learnt to write an prototype app for Windows Mobile which clocked speeds of RC vehicles, the threading I've used for a Teletext simulator. I could use the same information to talk to set top TV boxes, or create a custom piece of hardware which I could control using my phone, or to find out how magstripes or RFID work. Bluetooth's RFCOMM/SPP (serial port profile) is excellent for beginners, it's basically a serial cable without the cable, what goes in one end comes out the other end, no special driver or protocol knowledge required.

Basically what I'm saying is this: I personally hack to learn. I don't learn to hack. You can't "learn to hack". It's impossible. You can learn things by hacking, but you can't learn hacking. Never disregard knowledge, one day it might be important to something else you need to do. Try everything, I couldn't dream of doing half the crap I do now without learning the zillions of things I've put hours, days, weeks, months, years of effort into learning, and I'm ever thankful that I've done so. Maybe one day I'll become interested in security a little more, but if and when I eventually do, I can be sure that there will be a lot of things I need to learn, but because I've tried as many things as I have so far, I'll know just that little more before I start. It's important to be able to find things out on your own, and every scrap of knowledge you have will help you, sometimes it helps to have a starting point, but you can't always rely on people to give you the end of the piece of rope. The number of things I've tried or suggested and people have responded with "what? why? seems like a waste of time to me" is staggering, there's no way I would've tried half as much as I have if I hadn't gone out of my way to find out how to start.

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That. Security is all fine and good, but hacking is much broader. See, here's how it works for me:

I've been interested in a great number of things over the course of my productive computing life, and they pretty much all bleed in together. What I learn, when messing with bluetooth or IR or GPS or whatever often comes in very handy while doing just about anything else. While experimenting I code as much as I can myself, because simply using a premade app won't give me the understanding I need. As an example, if I just fire up TomTom, yes, I can get the information I need to know where I am, but that tells me nothing of how TomTom works, or how a GPS receiver works, or what data is provided, or how it's formatted or interpreted. By writing my own code, I get to see every last bit of data which is required, and I get to see how it all fits together, what it means, how it's used. Even the stuff you don't normally get to see because it's used in internal calculations or is just extraneous data.

Simply by wondering what goes over a GPS cable (or over the bluetooth airwaves, in this case) I learnt:

1) How to listen to a device over serial

1a) How to do that over bluetooth

2) How to XOR checksum data both for integrity checking incoming data and to provide integrity data while transmitting

3) What the NMEA GPS data was and what it meant

4) I sharpened up my coding skills by writing more reusable code

5) How to better dissect incoming data as quickly and efficiently as possible

6) How to send commands to control the GPS chipset, including the correct way to send the data (CR/LF/etc)

I then realised I could use the data in combination with other things. I used the programming knowledge I got from the project to integrate SMS capabilities into my test programs so I could SMS my laptop and have it SMS me back with info on where it was using the GPS data, so I then had to learn how to talk to a serial GSM modem (commonly found in 3G modems), which automatically meant more learning:

1) How to listen and talk to GSM modems (they often have similar command sets, based on the Hayes/AT set)

2) Further refining of reusable code and efficient transmission/reception of data

3) How to send and receive SMS messages using AT commands (it's trickier than you might think)

4) How to multithread my code (read: how not to make my apps lock hard) and how to pass data between threads

I also used the GPS stuff I'd learnt to write an prototype app for Windows Mobile which clocked speeds of RC vehicles, the threading I've used for a Teletext simulator. I could use the same information to talk to set top TV boxes, or create a custom piece of hardware which I could control using my phone, or to find out how magstripes or RFID work. Bluetooth's RFCOMM/SPP (serial port profile) is excellent for beginners, it's basically a serial cable without the cable, what goes in one end comes out the other end, no special driver or protocol knowledge required.

Basically what I'm saying is this: I personally hack to learn. I don't learn to hack. You can't "learn to hack". It's impossible. You can learn things by hacking, but you can't learn hacking. Never disregard knowledge, one day it might be important to something else you need to do. Try everything, I couldn't dream of doing half the crap I do now without learning the zillions of things I've put hours, days, weeks, months, years of effort into learning, and I'm ever thankful that I've done so. Maybe one day I'll become interested in security a little more, but if and when I eventually do, I can be sure that there will be a lot of things I need to learn, but because I've tried as many things as I have so far, I'll know just that little more before I start. It's important to be able to find things out on your own, and every scrap of knowledge you have will help you, sometimes it helps to have a starting point, but you can't always rely on people to give you the end of the piece of rope. The number of things I've tried or suggested and people have responded with "what? why? seems like a waste of time to me" is staggering, there's no way I would've tried half as much as I have if I hadn't gone out of my way to find out how to start.

Dude, you make an awesome point. But when I was referring to hacking I was referring to in a "broad" term, it's just at the time of peoples responses, it went in the direction of security, that's all. I plan to do much more than just focusing on the reverse engineering of software to find out how it works, I'm also going to focus on the hardware aspect as well. ie: understanding how RFID works, using kits like 'arduino' to show how machine code/assembly works, if you have a piece of hardware and you want to get your hands really dirty by finding a jtag port and learning how to interface with that, building radio's and studying them to understand how RF works, etc, etc, etc...

Also (please feel free to correct me on my opinion here) but when I refer to hacking, I'm referring to a persons inquisitive nature, mindset, and skill sets behind it (thinking logically, knowing what to question, thinking outside of the box or circle.). Granted some of those aspects derive from a persons natural ability to be able to do these things, a lot of this stuff can be learned if a person is really willing to focus and put their minds to it.

Oh and th3bigguy, I'm currently attending school at Northern Virginia area

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Absolutely, it's all about "doing stuff". If you don't want to know how x, y or z works then you probably won't care much about finding out, but if you're interested in anything and everything, you're probably going to want to try your hardest to do something with it. The skills involved are vast, from problem solving and troubleshooting through to physics, electronics and mathematics. You could be right about a natural predisposition to hacking, I think it's a point which could be debated, but I do think you have to have some prior interest - the fact you created this thread here though suggest you do, so you're half way to beginning already. Now you just need to find some stuff to hack about with. :D

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  • 2 weeks later...
I know some other school teachers trying to revamp the hacker high school circ. Until then here are some resources for you at the college level and at the high school level. These are some great opportunities for high school students. Also where are you attending school? I have my master degree in info sec...I was able to have a lot of fun during my research in some great topic of cyber war and cyber terrorism and the current threats of the cyber network. I hope this helps. Send me a PM if you want more info or the contact for the teacher working on changing the hacker high school circ. Enjoy.

DC3 - DC3 Forensic Challenge - hxxp://dc3.mil/challenge/2010/

Cyber Defense Education - hxxp://www.cyberdefenseeducation.info/

NIATEC - hxxp://niatec.info/

National Collegiate Cyber Defense Competition - hxxp://nationalccdc.org/

National Cyber Security Education Coalition - hxxp://www.icsec.org/

SANS Netwars - hxxp://www.sans.org/netwars/

IMPACT - hxxp://www.impact-alliance.org/

Cyber Patriot - High School Cyber Defense Competition - hxxp://www.highschoolcdc.com/

This is the first time I have heard about Netwars, and such. Very interesting, I will check it out. Thanks for the good links!

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