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Comprehensive Windows problems list


nullArray
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I'm trying to build a list of things that are fundamentally wrong with Windows..., XP, Vista and 7 (since they are all in use today and popular) are fair game.

I don't want to turn this into a bash thread though, so be respectful.

I'll throw my first two gripes out there and we'll see where it goes:

1. Updates. It seems like every time I turn on a Windows machine at work, they're requiring updates. Okay, apply, restart. Oh, more updates. It's like we're always playing catchup. It gets even harder when you have 150 machines you're managing to make sure everyone is updated. Of course, we have a script that reports out of date machines, but it's still such a hassle.

Auto-update keeps a lot of these issues in check, but Windows seems to have a penchant for prompting the user with a dialogue box that they must click before updates get patched. Here's a typical scenario.

-Microsoft puts out a new patch.

-The patch requires the user to click 'next,' 'I agree,' 'I do not want to participate,' etc.

-The user is not present, or doesn't get the notification

-The patch is not applied

-Autoupdate stops working because the user needs to activate the dialogue box

-The notification only popped up the one time, and must be forced (Start>All Programs>Windows Update or whatever) in order to patch

-Then auto updates will start working

This happens with WGA and IE8 installations. It also made scores of our machines require manual installation because the user didn't click next or whatever. There other problems too..., like an admin will have to babysit the patching machine because they pop up with questions that need action or the update stops. This happens with Windows XP installations too.

I would be fine with daily updates, if a sysadmin didn't have to constantly be doing this manual stuff. It's like self compromisation.

2. Startup and shutdown times............, far, far, far, far too long.

What do you got?

(I'd stay away from viruses. Windows is the major player, thus a target for all that kind of stuff. If Linux was as big, you'd better believe it'd probably be the same thing)

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Your doing it wrong.

If your using a domain, then you need to use Windows Server Update Services. This allows you to download updates once to a central server and deploy them from your LAN in a manged fashion, also reporting the machines with missing or failed updates. For instance at my place we schedule the updates to occur once a week. Things like IE8 are prevented from installing until we have a policy in place and can manage this update process. I also make sure that machine images include a full set of updates at the time of capture, so WGA is already included. Once the administrator approves an update, users are no longer prompted to click next to install. This is also coupled with group policy to manage the update process. We've never had the problems your reporting by doing it this way. You can also use things like Microsoft SMS or SCCM, which allows you to do push deployments of updates as packages, if you want to manage things with more finesse.

As for start up and shut down times, XP takes a minute or 2 to start on our machines. I've also changed the group policy to use hibernate as the default power button option, which means users turning on there machines in the morning have to wait seconds to start work. The machines will reboot once a week for updates.

If you don't manage things properly when administrating large amounts of machines, you will always get problems no matter the OS. So, sit down, do some research and start doing it properly.

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Your doing it wrong.

If your using a domain, then you need to use Windows Server Update Services. This allows you to download updates once to a central server and deploy them from your LAN in a manged fashion, also reporting the machines with missing or failed updates. For instance at my place we schedule the updates to occur once a week. Things like IE8 are prevented from installing until we have a policy in place and can manage this update process. I also make sure that machine images include a full set of updates at the time of capture, so WGA is already included. Once the administrator approves an update, users are no longer prompted to click next to install. This is also coupled with group policy to manage the update process. We've never had the problems your reporting by doing it this way. You can also use things like Microsoft SMS or SCCM, which allows you to do push deployments of updates as packages, if you want to manage things with more finesse.

As for start up and shut down times, XP takes a minute or 2 to start on our machines. I've also changed the group policy to use hibernate as the default power button option, which means users turning on there machines in the morning have to wait seconds to start work. The machines will reboot once a week for updates.

If you don't manage things properly when administrating large amounts of machines, you will always get problems no matter the OS. So, sit down, do some research and start doing it properly.

I don't have that much control over the network. They have to limit the things I'm capable of because I could access professor accounts (I'm still a student here). So it's not my bad. The update issue affects my mother too, for example.

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Ok, your admins are doing it wrong. Learn the tech, put together a business proposal and wow them. If you do it right, you will be able to get a good career bump, so mention things like comparing the return on investing in the stuff to the amount of work required to do without it. I can give you a hand if you want.

For home users, the only solution is user education I am afraid.

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Example:

WSUS is a great product....

1. You receive all the updates in one local location.

2. You can review the updates and take out you don't want or need (i.e. language updates).

3. You can monitor you whole environment using the WSUS Management Console that allows you to see exactly what Server (or PC) did not get the updates and how many are remaining.

4. Its done automatically! You just initialize and watch it go. It even reboots the machines for you.

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I'd like to go 64bit, to Vista Home Premium 64. The cost is what's wrong with it.

Recommending (any) Vista in a large network environment with Windows 7 less than 6 months away shows a great deal of inexperience and naivety. That is the nicest way I could phrase that and I'm doing my best to refrain from insults. :)

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Recommending (any) Vista in a large network environment with Windows 7 less than 6 months away shows a great deal of inexperience and naivety. That is the nicest way I could phrase that and I'm doing my best to refrain from insults. :)

I was talking about my home PC. This thread is entitled "Comprehensive Windows Problems List" not "Help This Noob With Updates". Problem: Cost. :)

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