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In the market for a gaming PC


Evan_93
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Hey, Aussie member here.

Was wondering if you guys could point me in the direction of some good gaming rigs that don't deplete the wallet of an exorbatant amount of money.

Prefer a bundle pack but I'm willing to look at just desktops.

Put some links up for me?

For example I've been looking through Ebay and Dealsdirect.com

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It hurts me to say it but for a gaming rig it is starting to be more cost effective to buy a name brand computer and up grade the video card through them. Even know it is un geekish of me having a warranty and a fully support rig can save alot of head acks especially if you just looking for gamin.

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alienware is definitely one of the longest running gaming rig manufacturers around. i've only ever personally bought a pre built laptop (not from Alienware) so... personally I feel if you don't build it yourself you're not very passionate about gaming, but that's just my opinion and nothing more.

also i wouldn't buy second hand, unless you're not concerned about warranty, etc...

Came across this thing here for Aussies heh. Don't know a damn thing about it...

http://www.priceusa.com.au/

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Do not buy a computer from prominent companies such as Voodoo, Falcon Northwest, Alienware, etc. as you will hand out a grand or two for the name and form factor alone. Pick a PC game mag and look for smaller companies that advertise there or even better build one yourself as you can score lots of high-end parts for discounted price on sale.

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  • 2 weeks later...

agreed, BYO (build your own) and hit up computer mags. The best computer mag for aussie's is atomic, they do some kick arse reviews of hardware. I always consult atomic prior to a custom build/case mod.

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Dude, I saw the SWEETEST deal the other night for $1000!!!!

Check this out, Just buy a Video Card and your set!

http://www.tigerdirect.com/applications/Se...&CatId=4149

LOOK AT THIS VALUE! Our Price: $1,059.99

Asus P6T Motherboard - Qty: 1 $259.99

Intel Core i7 920 Processor BX80601920 - Qty: 1 $299.99

Corsair XMS3 PC12800 1600MHz 6GB DDR3 Desktop RAM - Qty: 1 $109.99

Corsair XMS3 PC12800 1600MHz 6GB DDR3 Desktop RAM - Qty: 1 $109.99

Seagate Barracuda 1.5TB Hard Drive - Qty: 1 $129.99

NZXT Tempest ATX Mid-Tower Case - Qty: 1 $104.99

Corsair TX750W 750-Watt Power Supply - Qty: 1 $114.99

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Wait until tiger direct or any other sites have a huge sale and buy what you think you will need for your certain games . It's hard to tell people what to buy when simply a dual core, simple video card 8600 or newer and 2 gigs of ram will run wow on 60 fps . Where if you tried to run crysis on that your computer would explode .

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Be careful with the numbers on your components or you could end up getting something a lot slower than you expected.

For example, an 8800 graphics card is faster than a 9600, and an 8600 is faster than a 9500 which wouldn't even qualify as a gaming card, even though 9500 sounds like it would be faster.

Check the charts at tomshardware.com before you buy.

Also, you might want to get an sli motherboard so you can add a second graphics card later.

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small guild if you are building a pc for as little money as possible

1, Pick a good CPU for gaming. High end doesnt always mean better performance in terms of you noticing it. When it comes to gaming, videocard requirements increase much faster than CPU requirements, Many companies will try to offer $1000-$1500 CPU's and claim things such as "ultimate performance" but in reality if you look at gaming performance benchmarks from sites like tomshardware, it only performs slightly better than $150-200 CPU (generally only a performance boost of about 1-3FPS ). Put more money towards a good videocard and quality system memory. (PS if you overclock using the stock cooler, try to keep the CPU temperatures under 70C)

2, Pick a videocard that gives good performance for the money and avoid SLI or crossfire. If one card gets very laggy performance in a game, 2 cards wont do much better and you will just be wasting money. In most benchmarks, SLI and crossfire will only give about a 20% performance boost (SLI and crossfire = twice the cost, twice the energy usage). Another thing you will notice is when a new GPU series comes out, it is generally much faster than a SLI or crossfire setup or the previous series of GPU.

3, Avoid getting the top of the line videocard. They are always outrageously expensive while only benchmarking slightly higher. For example at the time of release, the nvidia GTX 280 was nearly twice the cost of the GTX 260 while only being 7% faster ( proof: http://www.tomshardware.com/charts/gaming-...0x1050,798.html ). The GTX 260 can be safely overclocked by up to 25% with very little change in GPU temperature (you can go higher if you alter the video bios to increase the GPU voltage)

4, Pick memory that overclocks well (you can get a idea of the overclocking ability of the memory be reading product reviews). Memory that is able to handle around a 15-20% overclock will give you a lot of head room when working with the memory dividers as you increase the CPU clock speed (incase you are planning on overclocking your CPU)

5, Don't skimp on the motherboard. Cheap motherboards don't overclock well and in many cases, they wont even offer you enough overclocking options to get a stable overclock out of your system. While it is good to avoid cheap motherboards, there is no need to go for super high end $300 boards because they generally don't overclock much better than the mid range motherboards (and even then, the CPU and memory will reach their max overclock before a mid range motherboard becomes unstable

( A gaming pc with a mid range CPU and a high end videocard will run modern games much better than a system with a high end CPU and mid range videocard )

(Be sure to read reviews on all of the hardware and pick out parts that wont be a bottleneck for the other hardware in your system, the benchmarks at tomshardware will allow you to see which parts will be a bottleneck for your system)

Give your price range and list which programs you will be using and we will select parts for you that will fit your price range

Building a gaming pc is always more cost effective than buying one

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Dude, I saw the SWEETEST deal the other night for $1000!!!!

Check this out, Just buy a Video Card and your set!

http://www.tigerdirect.com/applications/Se...&CatId=4149

LOOK AT THIS VALUE! Our Price: $1,059.99

Asus P6T Motherboard - Qty: 1 $259.99

Intel Core i7 920 Processor BX80601920 - Qty: 1 $299.99

Corsair XMS3 PC12800 1600MHz 6GB DDR3 Desktop RAM - Qty: 1 $109.99

Corsair XMS3 PC12800 1600MHz 6GB DDR3 Desktop RAM - Qty: 1 $109.99

Seagate Barracuda 1.5TB Hard Drive - Qty: 1 $129.99

NZXT Tempest ATX Mid-Tower Case - Qty: 1 $104.99

Corsair TX750W 750-Watt Power Supply - Qty: 1 $114.99

(-_-) omfg.... I wish I would've seen that post a few days ago... I just ordered $500 worth of upgrades from tigerdirect... I could've gotten that instead with tomorrow's payday :'( ... that bundle is sick

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  • 1 month later...

hey guys Im looking to get a new chair but I have no idea where to find it. I want that gaming chair where you can put the keyboard and mouse on it. Ive looked around the web and found some expensive chairs that do that. I am interested in any other ideas as well. just so you know I have a 40 TV and I use it for PC gaming and the 360. thanks

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agreed, BYO (build your own) and hit up computer mags. The best computer mag for aussie's is atomic, they do some kick arse reviews of hardware. I always consult atomic prior to a custom build/case mod.

Agreed, you can spend far less by building your own and you will learn a new skill in the process (If you didn't have it already)

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Indeed, if you where to build and equivalent to Alienware's £4805 computer your self you would save at least £1000, and possibly more depending on if you went for slightly cheaper parts (a motherboard that doesn't support 4 way SLi for example).

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