Jump to content

IT Jobs


Learnaseyego
 Share

Recommended Posts

Hello,

I was just curious as to how many of the hak5 community had IT jobs. If you do, what is it? What do you do? What degree (and or certifications) did you have to have to get It? I think this topic will help the members of the community that don't yet have IT jobs (like myself :( ) see what we should be doing to achieve a career that we actually like.

Thanks!

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Hello,

I was just curious as to how many of the hak5 community had IT jobs. If you do, what is it? What do you do? What degree (and or certifications) did you have to have to get It? I think this topic will help the members of the community that don't yet have IT jobs (like myself :( ) see what we should be doing to achieve a career that we actually like.

Thanks!

I am IT support, when it doesn't work they email me.

I got the job by writing a CV. This may sound strange and/or silly, I wouldn't have got the job had I not worked at Maplin Electronic the year before. I would recommend any one who wants to get in to computer jobs and has good background knowledge but no computer orientated qualifications do this.

Besides giving you a previous tech related job to put on your CV, it will probably teach you the social eloquence (which many geeks lack) required to explain "I'm afraid we don't sell miniDV to VHS tape adapters". It certainly did my self.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Linux System Administrator/ Web Programmer / DBA (offical title = IT/Marketing Associate) I have a degree in computer engineering. I got the job due to a lot of experience. If you want to work in IT I think a good place to start is to get basic desktop support down. If you don't know how to do that then why do you want to be in IT again? If you do then teach a class at your local community center for pay or for free to build cred. Also post flyers around your neighborhood and on bulletin boards around your area listing your skills and what you can do for them and steeply undercut the local repair shops. Get an LLC and you can say you owned your own company on your resume, looks great.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

I'm a systems admin for the university I go to. I also teach one section of UNIX. I do pretty basic support for professors and students, but the job is long term and I'm pretty sure they're working towards getting me working with the more complex stuff within six months.

I am just a regular computer science sophomore. So, I'm not particularly working toward this, but the experience doesn't hurt.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Well, I do not have an I.T. job yet (I have had one before though)

But I want to be a systems administrator, so I am working on finishing college with a b.s. in computer science and it will be under the networking portion of the curriculum.

The in-school program that teaches for CCNA (Cisco Certified Network Administrator) is built into the curriculum, so when I finish college, I am going to get that cert, and in 5 years afterward I am going to try to get my CCIE (Cisco Certified Internetworking Expert) i.e. the big dog network cert. *and per cisco you have to have a cisco cert and work in the i.t. industry for at least 5 years before being eligible to obtain a ccie*

I used to work for Gateway Technical Support through an outsource company, but to be honest, thats the best work to keep your study up on troubleshooting and just knowing your stuff, but it generally doesnt do jack for getting into a REAL I.T. job. The reason why I say this is that in most call center companies, IT or not, it's made where anyone can do it (Yah, even a caveman). So if you just so happen to be able to take a job like that (and beware no one makes it too long in those jobs for the high turnover rate. I was there for a year and a half, and I consider myself a veteran) then it may be worth it in knowledge.

Either certifications or college degrees in computer related fields are the best ways of having your foot in the door of an IT job. The major part is just knowing what your getting into. IE. If the job post says you need to know PERL and VBscipt, you best know it, or learn how before you get the job, or else you'll land flat on your face.

I would say if you dont know anything about troubleshooting, go buy a cheap old crap computer, and start tinkering *this way if you mess it up it can only be to your advantage because it will be a learning process* Learn at least a little about programming and networking, even if you have to take alot of time out for it as this will be to your advantage. At least learn the OSI, what it means, subnetting and things such as Windows Server 2003, and VBscript for networking, *windows server 03 is available for free for 120days from microsoft if you dont wanna get yourself some hacked copies and there is a command that will keep the counter up to 120 days* and for programming I would at least start off with some visual basic, and then graduate to some C++ action *you can get a c++ compiler for free from almost anywhere, just google seach. also Visual Studio you can get a cut down free version from microsoft* for programming, if you can tackle those, then your well on your way (and when/if you get to college you'll totally pwn all the noobs in your classes)

If you do happen to get into an IT job that DOES NOT require any skill, dont think that thats going to help you with getting a better job. I know someone who finished school (not a computer related major) and she has an IT job with a casino. She cant go up in the job because she has nothing as far as certs or computer classes, and she cant find a better job anywhere else so she's stuck.. but if she got some certs and/or college action, then she would be golden.

You dont have to go to college to get a certification. But you DO have to know your shiz. Read and learn. If your not going to college, go get something like BCT Nuggets and the cisco 1,2,3, and 4 books and learn your ass off and buy a REALWORLD router to learn on from second hand, or off of e-bay or amazon (something like a cisco 2100 or equivalent).

Do not think you do not have to spend money to get into this field. Even if it is just for fixing computers on the side you will have to spend at least SOME money, and it's a good thing to find out what is available and how the market is growing in your area. If you live in nowhere-ville, and there is nothing but cow-fields and crops, then go to another town and find out how it is.

Certifications are CHEAPER than college however, to self learn for certifications it CAN be more expensive than college (in the short term). Also you have to keep yourself committed. You dont want to buy a $300 router, a computer capable of running a couple of virtualboxes and Windows server and/or linux if you cant keep your thought process in check. Because this is the real reason why most people go to college. If I could learn just on my own, I would have never went back to college.

Hope this helps.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Data Center Analyst / System Administrator for a Fortune 1000 company- I run our Data Center from servers to facilities. I do grunt work and I do administrative work. Its all part of the job and I love it. Before I worked here I own my own consulting company providing system administration for multiple clients. No degree what so ever. I'm an example that experience still is as valuable (if not more) than a paper degree (a graduate with absolutely no experience in an enterprise setting). Definitely start from the bottom. Technical Support - Desktop Support - Server Support - System Administrator.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Network Support Officer for the department of education in Tasmania, Australia.

basically i provide a little more than user and computer support.

started as a trainee and now at this point. currently doing my Cert IV in IT Support.

before i only needed cisco IT essentials and Computer Science.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Would many agree that one usually starts at entry level and moves up?

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Would many agree that one usually starts at entry level and moves up?

I think sometimes it depends on who you know and what you know. Not all jobs require you to start at the helpdesk and work your way up the ranks. Sometimes, demonstrating your skills and experience is enough to place you in an open position elsewhere in the company, so long as you have the knowledge and skills, and can perform at that level, certs and education factor out. At least, thats what my bosses said when they look to hire someone. They rather have sopmeone with skills and experience vs allways picking someone with just their edcucation to show for themself.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

I've been told that one certification that looks really good on a resume is an A+ certification. That's what I'm studying to get right now. And I'm going to school for information security. I know that the same people who do the A+ also have a Security+ certification that I'll probably be getting sometime when I get further into my classes. I also volunteered at the local Technology Center in the computer repair class. That's what I'm doing to get to where I want to be.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Yes, I have an IT job. I work for an IT consulting firm, and basically what I do is design, build and maintain client's networks. We roughly have about 300 clients around the US. Unfortunately I have no college degrees, no computer certification and I'm 21. I have been working in the IT field since I was 16, I have worked for other consulting firm and the Government too.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Yes, I have an IT job. I work for an IT consulting firm, and basically what I do is design, build and maintain client's networks. We roughly have about 300 clients around the US. Unfortunately I have no college degrees, no computer certification and I'm 21. I have been working in the IT field since I was 16, I have worked for other consulting firm and the Government too.

You have no college degrees, no computer certifications? and you have worked for the government? What kind of connections do you have?

Link to comment
Share on other sites

It's possible they rather have good experience then a piece of paper. Or a combo of both

I suppose, but I don't think the government hires or even contracts work based of the word of experience. I'd say they might want a little more validation. But I could be wrong, I mean Iv never tried for a government job haha.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

I work in IT, if you can can call ISP tech support "IT". I'm currently studying many diff areas of IT but focusing on security. I hope to get a more "hands on" position, unfortunately the company I work for only wants to promote you to leadership positions like supervisors and managers ... pfft .. i'm no manager .. I'm technical, I like being technical, but alas no path to a higher level of tech support other than being a script-monkey. :P

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Join the conversation

You can post now and register later. If you have an account, sign in now to post with your account.

Guest
Reply to this topic...

×   Pasted as rich text.   Paste as plain text instead

  Only 75 emoji are allowed.

×   Your link has been automatically embedded.   Display as a link instead

×   Your previous content has been restored.   Clear editor

×   You cannot paste images directly. Upload or insert images from URL.

 Share

  • Recently Browsing   0 members

    • No registered users viewing this page.
×
×
  • Create New...