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Worlds Youngest MCP


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A fourth standard girl from rural Tamil Nadu has become the youngest to qualify the Microsoft certified professional examination. The Microsoft exam, usually taken by techies for better job prospects, measures problem-solving skills and Lavinashree (9) passed it with flying colours. By achieving this feat, she broke the record held by Arfa Karim, a ten-year-old Pakistani girl.

http://www.ndtv.com/convergence/ndtv/video...o.aspx?id=48240

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  • 4 weeks later...

We have a new chapmpion! 8 year old boy, youngest Microsoft Certified Professional!

http://www.timesonline.co.uk/tol/news/worl...icle5531687.ece

While the other elementary school pupils skim through their comics in the break between classes, Marko Calasan takes out his copy of Implementing and Administering Security in a Microsoft Windows Server Network for a light read.

At the age of 8, Marko has become the world’s youngest certified computer system administrator and was deemed the Mozart of Computers by the press after passing exams for IT professionals with the computer giant Microsoft.

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At least Microsoft are for equal opportunity.

Unfortunately for the boy, by the time he's old enough to make use of it, it will have expired and he will have to take it again.

I don't even think that is the point though. Regardless of the certification, the boy apparently is somewhat a genius for his age. The fact that he helps his parents when they have IT problems is what I find funny. They go to him with questions, when it should probably be the other way around.

Who knows, maybe this kid is the one behind the Conficker.B/Downadup.B/Kido worm. (j/k)

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I don't even think that is the point though. Regardless of the certification, the boy apparently is somewhat a genius for his age. The fact that he helps his parents when they have IT problems is what I find funny.

One of the departments I support is a pre-school nursery. I had to set up a computer for the kids to use (!!with no internet!!). I thought about setting up a local admin auto login, and immediately decided against it. I opted for a limited user auto login with a admin account with a password the staff know. When I had set it up and showing the staff person how to use it, it was mentioned the kids are leagues ahead of the staff when using computers.

The result is that the kids who are like *us* are more like *us* than *we* are, and with each generation they become more like *us*.

My first schools most 'advanced' computer was an Acorn <unknown model> which when using the word processor had to spend 2 seconds loading the font for individual character. If schools do manage to replace computers every three years (as all IT staff should scream down clients ears every time they complain a grater than three year old computer is running slow), then this Acorn will now be (at the absolute least) a Pentium 4 with 512 RAM almost certainly running XP. This brings my post full circle, the computer I set up in the pre-school nursery was a P4 2.4Ghz 1GB RAM running XP.

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Nice post... I find myself wondering, if these kids can achieve such a feat now, just imagine what they will be capable of once they reach adult hood.

I would personally hope they don't loose the creativity that I never (apparently) had, else they will achieve nothing.

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it's kinda weird to think that kids this young understand these things so easily now-a-days, and I for one find it kinda scary, because as we all know, the more people who know what we all know the less paid and more generic we IT people are... Now mind you I know this kid isnt going to be supporting a datacenter server and become a dba at the age of 8 or 10 or even 15 but these people will make us look like dinosaurs in the future. Just a thought...

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Geez whats next? A 6 year old with a CEH?

This is a bit distirubing. And yes the more IT ppl there is the more generic we become :( Even if the kid is that smart it sounds like that is all they do... not good for someone at that age. Next thing you know the kids will be bypassing the parental controls before the parents can figure out how to set them up.

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Geez whats next? A 6 year old with a CEH?

This is a bit distirubing. And yes the more IT ppl there is the more generic we become :( Even if the kid is that smart it sounds like that is all they do... not good for someone at that age. Next thing you know the kids will be bypassing the parental controls before the parents can figure out how to set them up.

the kids will be givin the parents the parental controls!! :o

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I wouldn't even bother with a microsoft cert. They cost to much, and expire too quick. Some employers realize this, and won't even bother footing the bill if you want to renew it.

If I was an IT management person, I would probably want my employees to focus on the "applies to every thing not just Microsoft" stuff. That is to say, understanding what has to be done to secure a DNS server not just how to do it on server 2003. As far as I'm concerned securing a services that uses a universal standard is trivial once you know how you want the service to act.

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Most CompTIA's exams never expire and are supposedly "indepedent" from any1 company's technology.

Self study for the skills and take any exam offered through them that may be good for your job (ie A+ for a general technician/support person). Then go back only if your employer requires it and take the proprietary exams.

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this is true. Too many times do you see how someone can (just for instance) boot into safe mode for windows and fix video driver issues, but rarely do you find people who can go into /etc/X11/xorg.conf and change things that are needed to boot.

Even though this isnt a networking example (as I am not 1337 with most networking, just home networking and some corporate networking) this is the same point.

Even better, it's just the same as if you put up a wireless network, and you make it 'secure' with say wpa2 personal and no ssid broadcast but you dont restrict mac addresses, or if your running a db and you setup security services for let's say the payroll department, and the even more crutial, the accounting department, but yet you dont know how to separate these two departments for more security. I dunno, is this correct? (I HATE Databases)

btw, Cheers to you! 4 all you dba's out there, cause you're more 1337 than I will ever be (or want to be)

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You know, after thinking about this for a couple of days (since hearing about the 8 year old taking the record), I actually think it's something of a shame, allow me to explain:

Back when I was starting out in the wonderful world of computers, much like many others, I had limited resources at my disposal. I didn't own my own computer, had limited access to what would now be seen as gutless calculators at school, and computers of any power were very expensive. Include in the equation also that there weren't easily available experts or even enthusiasts to beg for help and the internet was barely out of its conceptual womb.

This drove me through a pile of different systems and platforms with different characteristics, different hardware and OSs and I had to learn everything I knew myself and I had to make use of the decidedly (but comparatively) limited power of those machines. To obtain my own computers I had to scrounge and save and piece together junk, which taught me a fair chunk of what I know about hardware, and if I wanted to make them do what everyone else was doing (read: everyone with a current generation machine) then I had to learn how to optimise stuff, improvise, and I had to be patient. Maybe it's a personal pet hate, but it does irritate me when kids kind of expect all these machines and gadgets to just drop into their laps. "Back in my day..."

I believe this all gave me a stable foundation upon which to learn and grow in the world of technology and computing. Fast forward to today, however, and computers are everywhere. Not only are they everywhere but they're cheap, they're orders of magnitude faster than those of old (and that's an understatement, I can't imagine encoding H.264 on an ARM7 or a 68000). Surely this waters down the creativity and will to make things work somewhat? Perhaps I'm wrong, and if you disagree then please do tell me why, I'm actually interested to hear it.

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I am not very good with words, but, I do say I agree with you. When I first started out on computers, I started out on a commodore 64, then up graded to a over used commodore 128. Mainly to play games on. But my dad gave me a book on how to program the courser to bounce around on the screen, which took about one week to get the code all typed out and fixed.

Long story short, then upgraded to a Packard Bell 3300. First introduced to Win95. Learned a few more things. Then decided to take it apart and rebuild it. That is when I started really getting into computers. Like you did, I would go around and hunt for parts, or anywhere I could get parts from.

That is my little story about how I got into computers. But I am still learning all kinds of new things on my own, Using all the tools that are accessible. It is not hard to learn things on your own, but sometimes it is nice to have a helping hand.

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