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torrenting Slows web browsing.


flatlandinpunk17
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Ok i recently moved into a new apartment and got set up with comcast. in the apartment are myself and my room mate. i am the only one that torrents but when i do it kills the entire network. takes about 20 seconds for google to load on any machine in the apartment. and in CS:S i cant get a ping lower than 200 most of the time and when not torrenting i get a ping of about 30

now before you say its my router i was on verizon fios 30mb/15mb and it flew and in that apartment there were 6 of us that torrented on a regular basis. however fois isnt available in my area.

anyway back on topic. so now with comcast i have their fastest in the richmond area which is 16mb/2mb (which i am told is going to be going up soon.) and anytime i start torrenting nothing else wants to go fast on my network.

this is really annoying. i have been googling this for about a month now and every post i find is saying to change your routers firmware to dd-wrt. i am using a d-link 655. i have also changed the port which utorrent connects through. i have also tried different torrent clients. anyone have this same issue with comcast or any ideas for a work around.

any help would be a great help.

also forgot to mention i tried port forwarding on my router and that didnt help either.

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What is interesting but only slightly related is BT's poor implementation of it's 60KB/s cap at peak time. If you download some thing on steam in 'peak time' nothing else will work. Every DNS request and connection will time out yet Steam keeps downloading.

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What is interesting but only slightly related is BT's poor implementation of it's 60KB/s cap at peak time. If you download some thing on steam in 'peak time' nothing else will work. Every DNS request and connection will time out yet Steam keeps downloading.

this is interesting i have not heard this. granted i also dont know what would be considered peak time, i'm usually on my computer from about midnight till 4-5am you have to love working retail durring the holiday season. and i also have not downloaded anything on steam since i got orange box when it came out.

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side topic i found this while still searching that explains whats going on with the traffic but doesnt give any form of a fix. but what i dont get is why it does this on comcast and did not do it on fios. granted i understand both use a completely different technology to provide me with access to the internet i didnt expect it to be this great of a difference. or why this same thing mentioned in the post i am linking to does not cause the same effect on fios

George Ou

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What torrent client are you using? Does it let you change the bandwidth for up and downstreams?

I use uTorrent and it lets you customize these settings on the fly. Reduce your upload speed to no more than 30kb(For all torrents, not per torrent, but overall upload speed) and cap your downloads at around 300-500kb and you should be able to surf and torrent at the same time with no issues. Anything above 40-50kb upload on comcast and you will see your connections slow down drasticly.

I can watch youtube videos, download large files all while uTorrent is running, and I have comcast as well. You could also look into switching to openDNS and upgrading to a newer modem(not one from Comcast).

Beleive it or not, most of the time its your upload speed that kills your surfing. Not so much your downloads.

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You should probally invest in local QOS on the router, which would allow you to give http etc a higher priority than torrents. OpenDNS isn't really a fix tbh, its just an alternative DNS provider which might be slightly faster.

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i have been using open dns for years and love it.

QoS is on my router never set it before because i well forgot about it. and didnt need to with fios. gonna change some settings around with that.

i do use utorrent. need to try and fool around with the upload streams now and see if that will fix the issue. gonna be some fun trial and error for a little while.

Thanks for the ideas.

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Tried patching TCPIP.SYS ? Seems strange that it would work with one ISP then not with another if it were a problem with TCPIP.SYS but I had a similar problem (with only 1 PC not on a network) and patching this fixed it. I'm Using Utorrent too.

http://forum.utorrent.com/viewtopic.php?id=15992#p258231

Fios has a much larger upload tube compared to comcast, so if his uTorrent settings were setup for fios, they would probably kill his comcast connections in comparison.

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im pretty sure that the only problem is that when you have BT running it usually takes all your bandwidth, try setting your download and upload speed lower and see how it works. When i used to BT the same thing happened, it would take forever to load any web page. You could just BT at night 1am-6am something like that, good luck

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You could just BT at night 1am-6am something like that, good luck

The nice thing about utorrent is the scheduling preferences, where you can set different download and upload speed caps for different times of the day (or days of the week).

But in general, I would definitely say the problem is your upload speed cap is set too high or isn't set at all. Let us know if setting it around 30 kbps as suggested fixes your issue. That's the simple fix.

If your router has QoS, you could set bittorrent to a lower priority than everything else and then upload speed caps wouldn't be necessary. That's the best solution, because it allows you to use all of your network bandwidth (although you may then be in danger of exceeding comcast's monthly usage caps).

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  • 4 weeks later...

On a similar note, I was wondering is there a linux distro that you could install on a machine with two nics for bandwidth shaping/throttling or whatever it's called. (a bit like the way smoothwall works) - I do a bit of work for a hotel here in Ireland and they have a DSL line (7Mb down,784Kb up) and now and again they have speed problems surfing hotel sites etc. which is an essential part of their business, and their I.T. company based elsewhere has trouble logging in via logmein etc. and after some quick investigation I found out that they give free wifi and wired internet access to their customers and it's all on the same line!!! They're all on one LAN and they're trying their best to not get a second line in due to the current economic climate. There were speed issues yesterday for example and I did some checking with wireshark (learned nothing as I don't think I know how to use it properly) and I got a trial version of PRTG traphic graffer and I found out that nobody was taking the bandwidth at the time (although I think I got there just a few minutes too late) - the local pings to Dublin (30miles) went back to 50ms, which although terrible by US standards, was ok. when the speed issues were there we had pings of 500ms and above...

Anyway, to get back to the point,

I was wondering if there is some software or a linux distro that can be used to allow certain IPs more bandwidth than others, and/or prioritise HTTP traffic or block P2P, and I could put this "router" PC between the ADSL router and the LAN switch ???

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Look at this: http://lartc.org/howto/

A bit dated, but the concept still stands. The concepts and programs discussed are applied in Chapter 15, so you might want to start there and simply look up the bits that you're not yet familiar with.

Linux has a QoS module in its network stack if you choose to include it in the kernel, but I haven't used this yet.

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If you have a compatible router that use tomato I would suggest doing that. They give you the ability to set you the following using a GUI:

* Basic Network Setup

* Bandwidth Monitor

* QOS Classification

* QOS Graphs

* DDNS

* Bandwidth Monitor

Just whatever you do do not use DD-WRT

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DD-WRT is especially bad at writing secure code. This is because DD-WRT does not understand security. There is code out that can bypass all your security set on you DD-WRT router and can enable someone "like me" to remote as a root user on your router. DD-WRT developers supposedly develop and launched a patch but the code still works and many are still vulnerable.

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  • 2 weeks later...

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