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Found 1 result

  1. Hi guys, I've been playing around trying to create a Bluetooth version of Rubber Ducky working. Not sure how useful that would be, but I'm in the very early stages. Have been experimenting with this beauty: BBC micro:bit Most 11/12 year olds in the UK will have received one of these in school last year. The BBC ran a programme that allowed schools to apply for free micro:bits for all of Year 7 (6th grade). There's a friendly online interface to program them in Python, but you can actually compile C++ for these badboys. They're available for under £15 / $18: http://microbit.org/resellers/, hence making good little gadgets to mess around with for a BT Rubber Ducky. The micro:bit has a few pins available, a USB port, a small bluetooth antenna, it's very small and can be battery powered (or USB powered). On the front there are 15 LED lights and two buttons to play with: You can program the micro:bit to connect via Bluetooth, with little security (no PIN or anything). Then you can use the two buttons to send commands to the computer or smartphone. At the moment, I'm only able to send ASCII commands, so I've been mapping out the special commands in an ASCII/latin table. I haven't yet figured out how to use the Windows key, but I have managed to take a screenshot ("\x8C") and save a file with the name pwned ("\x99,s,pwned,\n"). Sample file available here, just drag and drop it onto your micro:bit, connect to 'ducky' via BT, the left button will take screenshots, the right button will save files. Code is available here, hopefully others will be able to assist with this experiment :).
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