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gravityzero

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About gravityzero

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  1. So I looked into this further. Using dmesg I get the following line when attaching the wifi adapter. usb 1-1.3: new high-speed USB device number 5 using ehci-platform. lsusb shows Bus 001 Device 005: ID 0bda:8812 Realtek Semiconductor Corp So it appears to be at least acknowledging the device at a rudimentary level. Still no adapter showing under 'ifconfig' or 'iwconfig' Does this appear to be simply missing the drivers? I don't mind doing the homework, if someone can help point me in the general direction. The driver for this card has been requested numerous times, so I feel the community as a whole would be helped by solving this issue.
  2. Went ahead and bought AWUS036EAC, but it looks to have the same chipset as the post above mentions, RTL8812AU. I got it working fairly easy in KALI using DKMS to install. Instructions Here https://github.com/aircrack-ng/rtl8812au Can't seem to get it working on the Pineapple and not sure where to start. Is there anyway to build the drivers necessary? Maybe using a GitHub Clone? I've spent several hours looking around tonight and gonna give it a rest for a while. If anyone has any ideas, please let me know.
  3. I was able to get the nano to scan 5ghz frequency once. It was quite a task. First I connected a powered usb hub to the pineapple. This USB hub had an input port that was not powered, but powered all attaching ports. I connected an ALFA AWUS052NH to the device and it was able to scan A-band 5ghz channels. It could also see associations. I would like to find a smaller usb dongle to work like this, but it is a hit or miss buying such a device. It mainly depends on the chip of the device. This is what I would like to test, or hear from someone who has tested. AWUS036EAC If you find something that works better, please let me know. Thanks.
  4. Thermal throttling has never been determined to be an issue. In my experience bridging with the Pineapple is fairly slow regardless, IMHO. Using OpenVPN is even slower due to encryption and the lack of processing power from the Pineapple. Speedtests are usually around 7Mbps up and down. BTW, This is a paid VPN service, not a situation where I control both ends of the tunnel. Different protocols would surely increase the speed. As for Infrared tests, I feel the temps are extremely good, as Sebkinne noted. That was the reason for this post. Around 120F is where I start having concerns. When the nano was originally released, I remember seeing posts regarding concerns for heat. This post was to show it is not really an issue. This pineapple was bought soon after their release and although sometimes warm to the touch, it does not run hot even under load. Overall I love the Pineapple and hope the goodness keeps coming. I had the Mark V, but this nano turns the dial up to 11. Best feature for me is being on VPN, regardless of the environment. Open WiFi at the coffeeshop, I'm on VPN player. Spoofed MACs & ALL.
  5. Just wanted to show an Infrared picture of the Wifi Pineapple Nano under load. This picture was taken running the Pineapple as a bridge to an Access Point. It is running an OpenVPN session using the latest firmware, so the processor is being heavily used. This is 30 minutes after starting the session. It appears from several photos that the hottest point is when using an attached usb wireless card. The USB is always the hottest point. Hope this information is helpful.
  6. I've searched throughout openwrt and hak5 forums to determine if there are any supported 5ghz micro usb dongles available to the community. My first guess is no, but I'm hoping someone can provide positive information. I know that aircrack-ng on the nano can show 5ghz information. I have done so using a ALFA AWUS052NH. Unfortunately, when using the ALFA card, I also have to use a powered USB hub. I'm looking to monitor 5ghz without all the additional equipment. Suggestions are welcomed.
  7. The best way to learn, at least for me, was watching youtube videos. There are many videos showing the use of both the wifi nano and the older MARK V. Also, it might benefit you to watch videos on using linux to capture handshakes, specifically KALI linux. The pineapple uses most of the wireless features available to KALI linux, just attempts to make them more user friendly. I would recommend youtube videos over any available e-book, but that is just me. I am a visual learner.
  8. It's very odd how this works. I've done quite a bit of research on this issue. For some reason the nano, when being used to repeat a wireless network, is flaky with DNS. Let's say I have an access point in my office building that delivers Internet. I can connect with my laptop and surf away. Now let's say I connect my nano to the same access point and use my laptop to connect to the nano instead of directly to the AP. For some reason, DNS will work sometimes and other times not. I have found a work around, but it is quite a hassle, also I don't remember this being a big deal with the MARK V. The work around is to SSH to the NANO and edit the /etc/resolv.conf using vi. Now put in additional nameservers that reflect working DNS servers. Like "nameserver 8.8.8.8" for google. Or even "nameserver 172.16.42.1". It really doesn't matter which DNS servers you use and you'll want to play around with these options to see what works. It may also help to directly add a DNS to your wifi card's settings. This is allowed in both Linux and Windows without affecting other DHCP settings.
  9. Very interesting question and someone may correct me if I'm wrong. The only way to enable monitoring for a wireless card using the nano is through ssh You would ssh 172.16.42.1 and enter your nano password. In the shell you would type airmon-ng start wlan1 or wlan2 (if you've got a secondary card) Then go back to the GUI and it should allow you to run the program. I really dislike this setup compared to the MARK V, which allowed you to toggle these options inside the GUI. It's really just a matter of adding to the next update or to a new network module. I'm sure others have noticed. Actually some modules on the wifi nano will actually enable monitoring mode without prompting. It's all in how the module is built. I wish all modules would allow you to choose the card you want, but not all do.
  10. I use it for openvpn too. It's a real easy setup. I've made scripts to initiate the vpn session when needed. installing openvpn on the nano is a little different than the Mark V. opkg update. then opkg install openvpn-openssl It is great to be able to make a secure session when needed, say at a coffee bar or other public wifi.
  11. I like the suggestion above. Routing them to a page you've created instead of where they wanted to go. Great point. You could also illustrate poor WPA2 passwords by using the pineapple to capture a handshake and using aircrack to break the captured hash.
  12. I just got a Pineapple Nano in the mail yesterday. I have to say that overall it is a great device. I also bought the Mark V years ago. One area of concern that I hope to get some feedback on is the wireless connectivity speeds. Using the Pineapple to attach via WIFI to another AP in order to use it's internet access. I've ran some tests last night and this morning. Using wlan1 to connect to an AP that can acheive wireless speed tests of around 20Mbps from a laptop. When using my pineapple as the conduit I am only achieving around 5Mbps up and down. I remember the Mark V having a defective card that caused slow speed issues. I am wondering if others have experienced anything of this sort with their nano pineapple? I'm using the latest firmware v1.1.3.
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