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nvemb3r

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About nvemb3r

  • Rank
    Hak5 Fan +

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  • Gender
    Male
  • Location
    127.0.0.1
  • Interests
    Computers, video games, and internets.

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  1. I came across this on Reddit. Nothing To Hide is a stealth/puzzle game where you navigate through levels while trying to stay within field of view of cameras within the game. While the game does emphasize issues with having to hide who you really are, this isn't a full blown propaganda game. The game's early demo has some rather challenging puzzles, and more should come in the game's later stages of development. nothingtohide.cc [media][/media]
  2. I did this through a VPN I subscribed to. While everyone in the far east can't brute force my OpenSSH service, attacks can still be attempted by anyone else that subscribes to the same VPN, or by users in my area with the same ISP. In a business environment, it would be better to roll your own VPN (that only a handful of people can access), but have another means of accessing your system other than the VPN. If the VPN is the only way you can SSH into a computer, than that VPN service can be targeted for a DoS attack. Once your VPN goes down, so does SSH access.
  3. One thing I did is white list the address ranges for your ISP and VPN for SSH use. That way it would only be accessible from your local area, or through your VPN. That significantly reduced the number of logs coming in from hosts abroad. I did this by messing with the /etc/hosts.allow and /etc/hosts.deny files.
  4. I've been using IPredator for a while, and I've had help with issues in the past. The only catch is that the only reliable protocol they're using at the moment is OpenVPN. They also support PPTP, which isn't good, and other protocols won't be supported til the end of the year.
  5. Sorry for getting back to you late. Accessing FTPS over port 21 instead of port 990 worked. I've had issues with iptables and the config file that I didn't notice before. :) Changes to vsftpd.conf: # Certificate and key locations rsa_cert_file=/etc/ssl/private/vsftpd.pem rsa_private_key_file=/etc/ssl/private/vsftpd.key # Turn on SSL ssl_enable=YES ssl_tlsv1=YES ssl_sslv2=YES ssl_sslv3=YES ssl_ciphers=HIGH # Enable Implicit SSL implicit_ssl=YES pasv_enable=YES pasv_min_port=15000 pasv_max_port=16000
  6. Hello, I'm having issues trying to unblock ports 989 and 990 on iptables. I'm able to connect to my vsftpd service with plain FTP (not what I'm comfortable with), and I've been able to unblock ports for other services I use (Apache, OpenSSH, etc). Every time I do a port scan, those two ports never come up. I don't know if I screwed up iptables, or if I screwed up my daemon. Or both.
  7. My household is sorta the same way. I don't mind helping my grandparents because they're interested in learning how to use the computer. Other people I've assisted in my home just see a problem and tell me to fix it. Here are some things they need to understand: There are some things I can't fix, and is beyond my control. Some things aren't broken, it's just how it works. I am not a miracle worker. I'm not gonna show you how to use BitTorrent.
  8. I used to use two factor authentication for full disk encryption until my Arch install broke. Now I just use a very lengthy passphrase (length > complexity in my opinion). dm_crypt can read specific files to use as keyfiles. The key file can be any sort of file, from a text file, a video file, a song file, so long as it gets the key from the file. I would recommend just using a textfile containing the key, unless you know how dm_crypt reads those files. Thats just what I did in the past, I'm sure there are better solutions.
  9. There is a hackerspace, but its about 35 miles away from my home, plus my day job ties up my schedule. I'm trying to get it all sorted out though. I'll look into open source projects for things I'm using right now.
  10. I'm not going to say I'm a professional programmer (I'm not even an employed professional, never had been), but I have picked up the concepts of procedural, object oriented programming, and tagging. I picked some languages up (not fluent in anything), and go to BBSs when I run into trouble (very reluctant to do so though). Aside from school work in the past, and some online tutorials, I've never gotten any real objectives as to what to do with the knowledge. I know that you write programs, but I'm unsure about what to make. Plus among those in my AFK social circle, I'm the only one interested
  11. It helps to keep very long or complicated passwords stored somewhere safe. As for unlocking your encrypted notebook, the only way you can access it without the password or key is by cracking it. :(
  12. I normally read non-fiction exclusively (if I can't learn from it, it wasn't worth my time). But my girlfriend had me read Cory Doctorow's Little Brother. It was an interesting tale about the City of San Fransisco being turned upside down after the Bay Bridge blew up. The protagonist uses the internet and information technology to fight against a surveillance state, and the author really tried to incorporate real working technologies (asymmetric cryptography, Tor) into this story. I've been wanting to look into more of Doctorow's novels. When it comes to literature, I'm a very closed minded p
  13. I've been given access to my domain's records, but it's not my name server. My VPS provider just provides free DNS hosting. I'm able to add A, CNAME, MX, and other records. EDIT: I used nslookup like you said, and it's refusing zone transfers. :)
  14. I'm not running a DNS server, and those settings haven't been available to me as far as I know.
  15. The people I got my domain from allows me to lock my domain, and I'm hoping that will disallow anyone from doing a zone transfer. I'm also going to look into DNSSEC. Verisign says that my domain is signed.
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