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Ep 1102 Install Using Btr5 R2


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#1 Tortus

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Posted 13 March 2012 - 09:11 AM

I was wondering if anyone has tried to follow the tutorial using BTR5 R2?. The file contents of /etc/fstab has changed from BTR5 R1 and not sure what to add and or edit.

I watched the episode again but this time with less red bull and vodka as my choice beverage and everything worked out ok thank you all for your help.

Edited by Tortus, 17 March 2012 - 05:39 PM.


#2 int0x80

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Posted 13 March 2012 - 01:51 PM

I upgraded to R2 from inside my R1 install, so have not done a fresh install yet. I wouldn't expect the contents of /etc/fstab to be an issue, though.
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#3 Valsacar

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Posted 13 March 2012 - 05:51 PM

I'm running BT5R2 installed that way, only thing that really needs to change is the one for /boot. Just remove the UUID and put /dev/sdb1 in it's place.

#4 int0x80

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Posted 14 March 2012 - 12:32 PM

The /etc/fstab editing is covered in the episode :]
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#5 slowjoe

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Posted 18 February 2013 - 10:32 AM

@ int0x80

 

Thanks for the episode, great instructions, worked a treat and with no problems.

 

Just a couple of N00b questions.

 

What happens if i lose the usb key or it stops working ? Do i need to back this key up somehow and if so what is the best way.

 

Also a stupid question I am sure, if you are deriving the key each time then can anyone do it if they had access to that key or they would need to know the offset, which could be computed in no time I am assuming ? especially if like in the example choosing 32 which is near the beginning ?

 

Sorry for resurrecting an old thread, thanks in advance.



#6 int0x80

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Posted 28 March 2014 - 08:14 PM

One good rez deserves another.  Mods please forgive me.  

 

Replies inline:

 

 

What happens if i lose the usb key or it stops working ? Do i need to back this key up somehow and if so what is the best way.

 

Definitely back up the drive.  I do this with dd -- let's say the USB drive is /dev/sdd in this example:

dd if=/dev/sdd bs=64k of=./boot_usb.img

Should something change like losing your USB drive, physical media degradation, or you just want to switch up your media (and use an SD card, for example); you can write the new device from the acquired image -- let's say the new device is /dev/sde in this example:

dd if=./boot_usb.img bs=64k of=/dev/sde

Now all the bytes are the same and you're good to go.

 

 

 

if you are deriving the key each time then can anyone do it if they had access to that key or they would need to know the offset, which could be computed in no time I am assuming ? especially if like in the example choosing 32 which is near the beginning ?

 

The key needs to be exactly the same in order to decrypt the drive.  An attacker would need to know your exact key derivation algorithm to recreate the key.  The approach to choosing your own method gives you flexibility here, aka pick your poison: consecutive bytes, every other byte, every third byte, offsets in the Fibonacci sequence, whatever you want.  Choose your own adventure -- you just have to do it the same way each time to always recreate the same key.  

 

Keep your operational security (opsec) in mind.  Who are your adversaries?  Are you worried that BART police might snatch your laptop, for example?  Then don't sit under a camera on BART with your keyboard and screen exposed while you decrypt your laptop.  You get the idea.


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